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Month: May, 2015

Writing a Training Program for non-security Employees

All businesses, no matter the size or industry, need a training program for their employees in security. Most already have one; they just don’t call it that. And because they don’t have a formal plan, the things taught get forgotten, until a disaster occurs, something is stolen, or worse.
So to address that shortfall, here is a list of the things you need to include in any training program. And these items will apply to all businesses. Not just high risk or retail establishments. And they should be done before a high valued item is misplaced or stolen, preferably anyway. And if that incident happens to be an active shooter in a WPV incident…

• IInventory Control
How do you control the inventory? Here are a couple of simple ideas;
Procedure for logging items in and out
Procedure for employee sales
Bringing new stock into the front
Access control to stock
And what about waste items

Cash Handling
Procedures for handling cash before, during, and after business
This includes: starting the cash drawer, bank deposits, & deposits if the amount in the drawer gets to be too much

Robbery/Disaster/active shooter plans
This may be vital to saving your employees and your business. Procedures to protect your employees during a robbery, disaster, or during/after an active shooter incident. Do you teach them what to do and not to do? It could save their lives at any moment that an incident occurs.

Duress codes
Do you have codes built in and instructed to your employees if they’re in trouble and don’t want to attract the criminals attention? And a duress code, by necessity, has to be innocuous and instantly recognizable.

After an incident
Do you have plans for after the incident? Who gets called first & what happens immediately after?
Do the employees know how to properly identify the perpetrator(s)? Do they know the who, what, when, where, why, and how to notify the appropriate individuals/authorities?

Alarms& CCVS
If you have alarms, which I hope you do, do they know how to use them properly? The same goes for your CCVS. If they don’t know how to work it properly, they may set it off at the wrong time, erase the recording, or otherwise damage your attempts to safeguard your business

Suspicious people
How do you want them to handle suspected shoplifters, robbers, or other criminals?
The same goes for other employees, what do you want them to do if they suspect a co-worker of wrong doing

Physical security
Who locks the doors, turns out the lights, sets the alarm, and other items of that nature?
Who do they report broken doors, locks, burned out lights, and etc. to?
Then when do they report it & then who’s responsible for ensuring that it gets fixed

My experience isn’t in retail or other such operations. I mainly dealt with warehouses, offices, and the like. But these tips and items can be taught to anyone in any business. As the owner or GM it is your responsibility to know what needs to be trained and who gets trained on what, and ensuring that they actually follow through with the plan. If they don’t you be severely ‘gigged’ by a disaster or criminal element, the health inspector is a minor irritant compared to these.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

The Employers Obligation & Responsibility for preventing WPV

Employers, especially those in the C-suite, are in denial about the effects of workplace violence (WPV) on their businesses. They simply refuse to believe that it can happen to them and their business. And if they do believe it can happen they figure that they can handle the increased insurance and bad PR.
I’m not completely sure of why they continue to deny the possibility. Unless it’s because they are sequestered away from the real world and don’t pay much attention except to the P & L reports. That is unfortunate. They do have to realize that preparing the company, which means spending money, to plan for WPV will save their financial bottom line in years ahead.
Another thing that I have said for several years is ‘If you ignore a problem and stick your head in the sand like an ostrich, don’t be surprised if you get bit in the butt.’ How many large multi-national corporations have been bitten because they didn’t take of a problem when it was small and manageable?
The federal government has set forth some very good guidelines and rules for helping employees stay safe at work. These take the approach that the employer is responsible if an employee gets hurt on the job. And this does include WPV, and in some cases even off the job.

Employer’s Responsibility:
The employer’s responsibility is spelled out in what is called the ‘General Duty Clause’. It states in no uncertain terms;

Each employer shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees.
This means that the employer must provide a place for the employee to work that is safe no matter what. If they don’t have a worksite that is safe, then they can be sued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or privately by the employee.
And just because the term is in that statement of recognized hazards, doesn’t mean that WPV can’t be sued over. If an employer denies or refuses to see a problem then that means they are short-sighted not because the hazard isn’t recognized.

Definition of Workplace Violence:
I have stated for a number of years that many incidents that aren’t considered WPV by most people should be and actually are WPV. What are those, you ask? Simple. And will let another organization spell them out for you – Workplace Violence Research Institute of Palm Springs, Ca.
Any act against an employee that creates a hostile work environment and negatively affects the employee, either physically or psychologically;
Physical assaults
Verbal assaults
Threats
Coercion
Intimidation
All forms of harassment.

These can be taken in many forms. It is up to the employer, and their agents (supervisors, managers, & so on) to ensure that none of these are taking place. If they allow any of these they can be sued. Whether they do unwittingly or not.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

Managing Security Officers – Part 2

Customer service:
Customer service goes both ways with managing officers. Both the company and client management have to treat their officers with the same fairness as they would an external customer. And with a contract company it may be just as important to treat them as a Disney or Nordstrom employee would, very carefully.
And this goes for client management as well. The client believes, usually in my experience, they can treat the officers anyway they wish and it won’t have an affect or effect on them. They can, and do in some instances, lie, cheat, & misinform the officers and blame it on them, not taking the responsibility for themselves. Additionally, they think that officers are nothing more than dead weight that can be cast off whenever they wish, or transferred. Even if those reasons are illegal, they’ll do it to the officers, and contractor, anyway. This leaves the contractor holding the bag, generally, for anything improper.
When it comes to contract management, it’s the same thing. They think of reasons to get rid of people if they want. And in right-to-work states it can be worse. I will be the first to say there are times when we had to be tough on an officer because the client demanded it and they expected such. But finding a reason to terminate someone because they didn’t exactly look the part…

Conclusion
As security professionals, we need to be more aware of how we manage our officers, so that we do it efficiently. Does this mean we should be lenient when they do wrong? Absolutely not. I’d be the first to fire someone if I thought they deserved it. And at the very least transfer then to a more appropriate post.
However, the one thing we have to consider is that the client isn’t always right! And I don’t really care what the old adage says. The customer is not always right, and sometimes they are just plain wrong. And we need to tell them that, even at the risk of losing the account.
And this goes for security company management as well. While we like to think that we are always right and our mistakes will never cause a problem or are so minor as to be annoyance, that’s wrong as well. We are just as human as the officers who work for us, and therefore just as prone to making a mistake as anyone else, no matter our level of education or experience.
So, we need to take a lesson from the Attitudes that foster violence in the workplace and learn to treat everyone equally and not disparately. No favoritism, And no shifting blame to someone else if we do something wrong – like a 2 year old.
Manage with compassion, as far as you can, distinction, and loyalty. If we do these things, then we’ll get loyalty and dedication in the process. And hopefully with the right training and managers, officers who know what to do, both when and how. Treat them like adults, and supervisors, until they prove you wrong.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Professionalism & Security

When I talk about security officers and that we need to train them to be more professional, I get asked a question. What is professionalism? They wanted me to define it. The question itself was profound and a tad puzzling. Mainly because it means something to practically every person in every field.
Ask a computer programmer what professionalism is and you get one answer. Turn around and ask a security officer what it is and you’ll get a different answer. And chances are, their managers will have something even moredifferent to say.
Being in the security field for 32 years, striving for professionalism has pushed my management skill to the limit. Professionalism is one of my biggest pet peeves within the field. I have pushed hard for every officer I’ve managed, supervised, or over saw to be professional. Now that I’m not in the field, working actively anyway, any longer, it isn’t above me to either compliment a security officer on their professionalism or correct them when I’m out and about.
So what do I think is the appropriate definition of professionalism within the security field? It doesn’t matter if it is for a security officer working third shift at a ‘dirt-ball’ post or managing a 100 officer site, it’s all the same. And consequently, it will make everyone better.
So here are a few of the items that make-up that elusive term so hard to define;

1. Perform your duties in a quick and succinct manner. The cliché’ I use in my customer service workshops definitely applies. You do ‘Whatever it takes to get the job done. Right!’ I’m not above breaking a few rules or cutting corners or red tape to get the job done. Sometimes it makes people mad – except the person you’re working so hard to do right by!

2.Being perfectly business like and efficient. Just because you’re being business like doesn’t mean you have to be aloof and cold to the people you’re serving. You can laugh, joke, & do other things as well. But you have to maintain a sense of not being too close to anyone, lest the idea of being compromised comes into play.

3. Customer service. Yes, customer service. Customer service plays a crucial role in being professional. And you have to remember it is reliant on more than just those from the outside, your external customers.
You have to take care of all 5 sets of customers before you can be considered professional. You have to take care of both your internal and external customers.
Take for example if you’re a manager. An officer calls and needs some information, not crucial but important to them. If you don’t treat them the same way you do a client then you’re not servicing them the right way. Likewise, if a client calls up and needs something, you can’t just ignore them while talking to an officer. You have to prioritize and then deal with everything that pops up – as quickly as possible. And if it’s not quick, apologize!

4. Be properly attired and your physical attitude. If your uniform/working clothes are not serviceable, then you won’t look professional, which has a lot to do with your professionalism, as unrealistic as that may be. If your clothes look like they’ve been slept in, used as a mop for your lunch, or not cleaned for a while, it doesn’t present a very professional appearance. And this goes for both on and off duty.
Likewise, your physical attitude is just as important. No, I don’t mean you need to act like the Terminator. What I’m speaking of is an attitude that I learned more than 30 years ago living in the military town of Minot No Dak. ‘Walk like you know where you’re going and have something to do once you get there. I will guarantee you that if you hold your head up, shoulders squared, and walk purposefully, and not slouched and shuffling, you’ll not only clear a path, but you’ll be accused of being professional.

5. Never stop learning. It doesn’t matter learning what, just don’t stop. Whether it is in security or another field that is a hobby. When I was just starting out, and up until I went blind, I read as many as 5 newspapers a day, 4 or 5 magazines a week, and as many books on the field I could in a month.
This is how I learned. Even though I never got a piece of paper saying I had a degree. Most people who meet me think I have a degree in… something. But everything I know and have taught about security is entirely self-taught through reading and observation.

It’s not that it is all that hard to be professional. What may be difficult in this area is to remember everything you need to be and act professional. There are many detailed facets to being and acting like a professional. Most of it is intangible and can’t be taught as I stated myself I am still learning things about being a professional after more than 30 years in the field.
And of course professionalism doesn’t start or stop at the time clock. You have to be a constant professional to prevent someone from thinking otherwise. Is that hard? You bet it is! You can’t drive down the road to a meeting, flying, swerving, cutting in and out, and swearing like a drunken sailor and expect someone who may see your erratic behavior think you’re anything but a lunatic.
The best isn’t, and good enough never is

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him through his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Managing Security Officers

Ashamedly I’ll be the first to admit that I haven’t always treated officers in the fairest way I possibly could have. And unfortunately, the way officers are trained and managed by their management, supervisors, company, & clients, isn’t much better at times.
At First Response, in Mission Kansas, I remember a couple of incidents where my judgment was called into question over the way I conducted business with an officer. And in all but one it was my fault, fortunately I had many more successes than failures back then in dealing with officers.
In many companies, even those within the security field, they don’t treat their officers with the respect they deserve. It doesn’t really matter whether they are contracted or not, they are management’s enforcement arm for company policies, procedures, rules, & regulations. Therefore, the thinking is that they don’t deserve respect or other such things because they’re just gears in a grinding machine. And I know this will rankle a few management people in the field, but…
And when it comes to even company management, at times, they don’t treat us with respect. In many cases, the security team is treated with the attitude of a necessary evil, and never backed up when a complaint comes in from an employee. And generally, in far too many instances, they are paid less than contracted janitors.
In my 32 years in the security field this has happened to me on more than one occasion. Disparate treatment to both me and my officers was rampant. In a couple of posts where I was the Field Supervisor/Manager what the security staff did was never right. We got the end result of constant complaints and back-stabbing. And management didn’t back us up even once, even when they told us to do something and we accomplished the goal. And this was done to appease the union stewards and rabble rousers.
Another aspect of this is training. And what bugs me the most about this, is that after we have invested the time, money, & energy into training officers specifically for that post, the client blames us for something that we did or didn’t train them in. And many times, we were never told to train the officers in this area. Or worse, we trained them the way the client wanted them trained, and then the client contact changed, which meant…
Sometimes the security company is to blame for many problems with managing officers and keeping their loyalty. When we train an officer in one way and then they deviate from the ‘tried and true’ method, we blame them for something that goes wrong. And in some cases, we train them in certain areas and then we blame them for doing it the right way. Then after we blame them for this, we either transfer or terminate them. It’s our fault but the officer pays the price for the client/company screw-up.
I also remember a company I worked for in the mid 90’s (Allied Security), where I had to transfer several officers out of an account, a very large 75% of our billable hours, for what can be said were b—s— reasons. I didn’t like it and after voicing my opinion to the branch manager, he did it himself instead of forcing me to do it. And the worst part was that we weren’t allowed to inform the officer of the true reason behind the real motivation of the transfer.
One of the officers was a light skinned black guy with a red (not dyed) afro. We transferred him because the building manager didn’t like black people working security at his building, he didn’t trust him. The other was a lady who literally, they said, smiled too much and was too friendly, while working the front desk at the corporate office. Can we say disparate treatment to both of these officers, who were excellent at their job?
Look for the 2nd part of this next week

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.

His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Making the case for security

Many security managers can say they’ve had headaches over this issue. And most consultants will say the same thing. It’s hard to convince the c-suite to spend the necessary money to increase security in their facility.
In some cases it may be justified. Non-profit organizations or small businesses may not have the financial resources to spend hundreds, much less the thousands often recommended, of dollars to increase security, because no inexpensive (but reasonable) choices are offered, especially to a non-profit. Most figure that it CHH, it Can’t Happen Here.
But here are a few tips that you may be able to utilize in presenting your case to them. And these are only a starting point for any discussion for increasing security, especially if you’re either working for or consulting with a non-profit. Hopefully, you can convince them to spend or adopt changes without resorting to dramatics or anger, on either side.

Points to Cover:
• An organization is only as strong as its weakest link i.e. locks, lighting, people, or similar
• Emphasize the importance of never having the attitude of ‘Just this once’ in opening doors and etc.
• Prepare, preferably in your industry, a list of recent incidents in your area.
• Show them that a tightening budget will restrict how safe the facility & employees will be.
Again a list of recent incidents may be a good start, if possible
• Utilize all necessary statistics for crime both nationwide and locally. Use the statistics for workplace violence, theft, fraud, burglary, and others against businesses
• At the same time as the statistics list the methods used to perpetrate these crimes, hopefully some of them will fall into what you’re proposing
• No one solution will solve your issues – not technology, personnel, or hardware
Show them how training your employees in security awareness, emphasizing what can happen if not followed. Use a worst case scenario to further emphasize the facts
• Inform them of the rule of less privilege can, and will, decrease the chances of either a computer hack or barrier breach
• Show them of the wisdom of restricted access control and the differing levels of access control
• List and show them your observations to all security areas, even if they cross over to inventory control, shipping, HR, garbage, as well as computers and other items
• Show them how they have to be involved to gain acceptance of the security plan to the employees

Keep in mind, as I stated above, you have to use these points as a place to start. You need to develop your own list and expand it out to fit your organization or business. As I always do, I’m giving you enough to get you started on this project and not much else, mainly because what I think is important won’t be to you.
What you also have to do is avoid an old trap. “I’m the security manager and I know what’s best for security here. Why can’t you trust me and do what I ask/give me what I ask for?” All this is going to do, in most cases, is cause the c-suite to not trust you. Or worse just dismiss you out of hand for being unrealistic.
Another thing you have to remember is that the c-suite may not recognize the numbers you present. For the most part they are concerned with P & L statements, projections for revenue, orders/shipping of same in the next quarter, and the general overall bottom line. YOU are a cost center and not a profit center. Therefore you need to convince them that you are a profit center and not just a cost center. How do you do that?
You show them that by implementing your changes, whether they are policies, procedures, additions to costs, or whatever, that you will save them money in the long run. Be prepared to show them what the return on investment will be (ROI).
Will these always work? No, but they are a start. And you’ll notice one word consistent throughout this post and you must utilize it as much as possible. SHOW THEM. If they can see it and not just hear it, it may well convince them faster. Use your salesmanship, not to mention your showmanship, and soft sell the C-suite on your plans. It won’t be easy but it’s better than having an incident and then over spending on items you don’t need.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Contracting for a security company (revised)

One of the biggest problems that companies, of all sizes, face when contracting for security officers at their facility, or a remote one, is the contract. What needs to be added and what is the client responsible for.
I hope that this post will help those of you who are on one side or the other to determine which points should be addressed and included in the contract. This is mainly because you can’t just say “There is the spot. Now go guard it!” You have to be far more involved than that.
Being involved with and having been on both sides of this for more than 20 years I think I have some insights on the issue. And yes, I’m kinda biased when it comes to security officers, which is one reason I was so good at it and I had the loyalty of my officers, even when being in management and having to discipline them.

1. The hours they’ll work. This has to be fairly set despite the fact the company should be flexible enough to accommodate hours that move. Just give them enough notice before you change.

2. Uniforms. Yes as the client you are tasked in what they wear. Do you want them in a military style uniform or soft corporate look? Possibly you want them in coveralls for a dirty post. The type of uniform they wear will determine how much they are respected and carry out their duties & responsibilities.

3. Training. As with pay, the client is responsible for knowing how much training is required on the post itself and providing that training at a reasonable bill rate. If the job is complicated and the operations manual is long and involved, then several days of training may be necessary to acclimate the officers to the post. Sometimes this may mean 40 hours or more.
Likewise, if the post only requires the most basic of patrols and reports, then maybe only 1 shift of training is necessary. Whatever the training time required, the client needs to be willing to pay for at least half, hopefully all, of it. No matter if it takes 40 hours or 8
Additionally, as a recent court ruling has proven (March 31, 2015 Philadelphia, PA. U.S. Security Associates, Inc. of Georgia), a WPV incident) you need to train and inform the officers on crisis procedures. It’s not enough anymore to just train them to observe and report. Your officers need to be more professional.

4. Lastly is pay. You have to ensure that the officers get paid at least as much as your contracted janitors. Ensure that the wages they are making reflect the duties they are expected to perform and the performance you require. If they are simply a ‘fire watch’ and doing nothing more, then minimum wage may be okay. On the other hand, if you are requiring them to make patrols, write reports, access control, monitor systems & alarms, providing excellent customer service, and other such items then several dollars above minimum is necessary.
The key point here is don’t low ball the contractor. And don’t pit companies in a bidding war. And don’t play them off one another for a lower bill rate. All of these will get you nothing but problems and turnover in the long run.

5. Who is responsible for the post orders? Another point to consider that is vitally important is who is responsible for writing and maintaining the post orders. From the initial set when the post is started to additions, changes, or revisions. The client needs to be responsible for writing the first set of them. Why? Who knows the facility better than the client?

Are these all the points you need to cover? Absolutely not. There are a myriad of items that need to be looked at in the contract. Without any explanations, as the above, here is a list of those items
• After hours and on-site supervision & management
• Scheduling
• Equipment, company or personal (including what is prohibited)
• Client contact during and after business hours, as well as vacations
• Emergency call lists
• Extra officers or shifts
• Times needed for the officers
• Time limit requirements for getting extra officers/coverage on-site
• Customer service/performance requirements
• Licensing and such for the municipality
• Background checks, if not required by the state or municipality
• Officer ‘extras’ i.e. vacations, medical, time off, & etc.
• Any special requirements that may be needed
And these may only be a short list of what you need in the contract! Depending on your company and situation you may need a whole lot more. Places such as nuclear power plants or chemical manufacturing facilities.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Perception is Reality

July 2012 Movie theater, Aurora, CO.
April 2013 Boston, MA bombs at the finish line of the Marathon
January 2014 Columbia Mall, Columbia Maryland
February 2015 Monroeville Mall, Monroeville, Pennsylvania

What do these dates and deadly incidents have in common, other than supposedly senseless violence? I can answer that for you very simply. Despite what they will or have argued in court, it makes complete and total sense to the shooters. That’s what I said. It makes complete sense to them.
The above phrase in the title is the reasoning why. Their perception of reality is why they do these things. Like in any workplace (WPV), school (SV), or domestic violence (DV) situation. The perpetrators will figure a way to distort their reality and begin thinking they were right in doing what they did.
And it will be hard to dissuade them of their reality. And you may be thinking ‘why is it hard’? Let me give you a few examples of reality being distorted for unknown reasons;
The Jewish holocaust in WWII
The Crusader murders of Muslims during the Crusades
The wife abuser who says ‘she had it comin’
The man who shoots and kills his boss because ‘the boss didn’t like me and kept me down’
Or the teenager who says ‘I was bullied and they wouldn’t stop’
Any of those sound familiar? I’m sure they do. And mainly they sound familiar because we’ve heard it out of many perpetrators of WPV, SV, & DV. Not to mention those spouting their hate speech in the name of religion. And their reasoning? Perception is Reality.
These acts of violence were NOT senseless. It makes, and made, perfect sense! At least to the shooters. To normal people it doesn’t make sense to anyone. From law enforcement, to the media, to the shoppers who were scared out of their wits and will be for months or years, and anyone who refuses to see the vulnerabilities in our security systems and their own sensibilities.
These shooters are just a few of the people who have a distorted view of the world and a real perception of reality. The key is that while 99% of all people believe that the violence was senseless; to the perpetrators of these mass shootings it made perfect sense, and supposedly ‘just snapped’.
If you look at every incident of WPV over the past 30 years, the perpetrators had a perception of the world. And literally no one could dissuade them of their perceptions. Whether that perception is of persecution, stalking, or whatever it was there, and in their mind it was perfectly acceptable to do what they did.
So was this a senseless act? To us perhaps. To the perpetrators it made perfect sense to take other people with them when they went out. Did they have remorse after killing and wounding innumerable innocents? Most committed suicide so we’ll never know. Those who survived, for the most part, they didn’t… “They deserved it”.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

WPV numbers for April

April would seem to be a calm month for those who want to do harm to others in the workplace. However, I have to think that the reason for the decline in numbers that I have heard about is because they just don’t get reported.
Once again I’ll blame the media and the locality of reporting. Unless it is a mass killing, or plot to do so, it won’t make the news. I believe that the media is getting tired of reporting such incidents. And on top of that, most news stations won’t even call such incidents WPV i.e. the incident in Phoenix on the 16th.
That incident started out as an argument between brothers over the operations of their varying partnered businesses. It culminated in 5 dead and a family traumatized. The difference is that it happened at a residential address where they ran the businesses out of – not a regular business address.
Another potential reason for the decline in numbers is the amount of news about terrorism, Iran, Yemen, ISIS, Baltimore, & innumerable other stories that capture the attention better than a near deadly WPV incident.
And as always if you would like to see the briefs of the incidents I collect, please go to my Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany . But without any further dawdling;

Phoenix April 8 4 w
Suitland, Md. April 9 1d 2 w
Denver, CO. April 10 (school) 0
Goldsboro, NC. April 13 (school) 1d
Phoenix, Az. April 17 5d
Rancho Cucamonga, CA. April 21 (school) 0
New York, NY April 28 0

April: 7 incidents 7 dead 6 wounded

Total # of incidents: 55 Arizona 20 33 Dead 63 wounded
As a small additional note, you’ll notice that we are averaging an incident just more than every 2 ½ days. If I collected every single incident that I could, doing extensive research instead of listening to the news, I would be able to collect more than 300,000 incidents every month, which averages to about 45,000 per day.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

How does a blind person do what they do?

It is crazy. I get this question all of the time. I’m independent and stubborn. And because I insist on being independent I get asked this question, a lot.
To some people, they don’t understand how I can clip my finger nails without seeing them, or cutting my fingers to shreds. Or cook, especially stuff in the oven or boiling water. Or hear noises that most people don’t. Or get around without a permanent guide next to me.
After 12 years of this it’s all 2nd nature. Let me answer these questions in security professional speak;

• Clip my finger nails without cutting my fingers to shreds
I do this the same way you have to conduct a security risk assessment or threat assessment. You have to take your time and ensure that everything is in the proper place and you account for everything that may cause trouble, no matter how remote. If you make a mistake, hopefully, you stop before the blood starts and you try again. It’s not easy but it can be done.

• Cook, especially stuff in the oven or boiling something
Just like a risk assessment you have to take your time. With cooking food that is really hot or scalding, use the pot holders and ensure it’s not too heavy for you to move. This goes along with the operations of your department. You have to be aware of the limitations of your officers and lift them carefully so that everything comes out okay. By lifting, I mean coaching and mentoring as well as training them over and above what’s required.
Sometimes you have to handle certain officers with pot holders. In other words they need to be ‘coddled’ and empathized with for a few minutes. But if it gets too much you gotta put it (them) down (terminate).

• Hear noises that most people don’t
Some say I’m psychotic because I hear things, I’m not. And no, my hearing hasn’t gotten better because I’m blind. But being in the security field as long as I have, you have to pay attention. Especially to detail. Which means sounds as well.
When you’re alone in a dark warehouse at 0300 on a Sunday morning your hearing has to be alert and aware. Rats or other animals can make the same noises as someone trying to break in or get away.
The lesson here? Pay attention to what’s going on around you. Train your ears and nose to recognize what’ should be there or not. Chemical smells, gasoline, propane, scrapping and dragging. All things that can indicate innumerable things, especially someone trying to injure your company/client.

• Get around without a permanent guide next to me.
Do you need a permanent guide to get around a new town? How about your security officers after a bit of On the job training, can they get around a new post or assignment? Of course they can! So why would I be any different?
I study where I’m going and get detailed instructions in how to get where I’m going. From there I use my senses, ears & nose, and find my way. Do I make it all the time alone? No. Just as you and your officers might, I get lost and have to double back or make a different turn.
And if I’m going somewhere I’ve never been before I do need a sighted guide at times. But that is rare and far in between. And to answer your curiosity yes I’ve bumped into walls more than once, but they’re okay, just minor dents.
Do your officers, whether they be contracted or not, sometimes need a map of the facility for the first few times around? If they are on a vehicle patrol, do they not need a map of their patrol station? And do they not get turned around and lost from time to time? We all do, whether it is at work or out and about.

Being blind is only limiting because you can’t use your eyes in a world that is visually oriented. But as I go along in this life I discover that being a good Missoura Mule, stubborn, obstinate, & independent, is helpful. I keep moving forward until I get it right and that’s the lesson for security professionals – keep moving forward until you solve your issue.
“Nothing is impossible. The only one holding you back is yourself”

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.