todaystrainingblog

A great WordPress.com site

Month: April, 2015

With WPV One is too Many Workshops

Recognizing, Preparing, & Preventing WPV

On the 6th of May I will be presenting 2 workshops on workplace violence (WPV) in Mesa Arizona. I’m hoping you would find it both informative & entertaining. And hopefully, you’ll find information to keep you and your employees safe from assault and lawsuits.
The workshop is at 2 different times. The first session will be from 9:00AM to 11:00AM and the 2nd one will be from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM. It will be held at the Quality Inn located at 1410 South Country Club Drive in Mesa.
This workshop will help you prevent WPV and assist you in preparing for such an incident in your organization. WPV takes its toll, mentally, physically, and financially, on businesses and the people who work there. No matter if it’s a customer, co-worker, significant other, patient, or student. And Domestic violence (DV) causes even more tragedy with 40% of all WPV incidents being instigated by DV!
In this workshop you’ll discover:
• The warning signs of someone who may ‘go off’
• Physical Security measures & techniques
• Policies & Procedures you need to assist in avoiding an incident
• Defusing the human bomb
• Incidents for 2015, both nationally & in Arizona
• What customer service has to do with preventing WPV
• Forming a Threat Assessment & Crisis Management Team
What else you’ll learn;
• What attitudes are most dangerous from an employer
• The profile of the average perpetrator
• Startling trends and Statistics about WPV that You Need to Know
• What workplace violence is and isn’t, with a demonstration
• Where WPV occurs

Price: $30 per person or $25 per person for 5 or more
Registration: Please call 480-251-5197 or send a mail to rdsollars@aol.com with workshop in subject line
Copies of the book “One is too many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace Violence” will be given away in a drawing (1 per session)

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

An Average Profile of a Perpetrator

While these signs below are the most frequent profiles of people who will perpetrate an incident of workplace violence (WPV), it is by no means the exclusive and definitive list. Just as many WPV incidents can and will be carried out by people that don’t fit comfortably into this list. Therefore, we must be constantly aware and be willing to spot/report something.

Age:
The age of a perpetrator will usually be between 25 and 45 years of age. But in recent years we’ve seen people as young as 20 and as old as 70 that will commit an incident.
As with the 17-year-old in Monroeville PA. in February, no one can ever say that he was within the normal age group of either WPV or SV. The same holds true all the way around. I believe the ages are lengthening.

Race & Gender:
The overwhelming majority of incidents are committed by white males. Again, this is the majority. There are numerous incidents where I can point you to a female and a black, Asian, Hispanic, or Arabic descendant who perpetrated the crime.

Weapon:
The majority of people, media and law enforcement alike, believe that most WPV incidents occur with firearms. They do not! Only the incidents that get the headlines are committed with firearms. More incidents are committed with fists, words, & other implements than are with firearms, including hammers, screwdrivers, & even pencils. As it has been said for a few years in the media, “If it bleeds it leads”.

Family/work Stress:
Serious stress in someone’s family is also in the profile. Stress, as I’m sure you know, can come from many different sources. From a child’s illness, financial, divorce, and so many other items. If you look at most incidents there is stress of some kind that is among the reasoning’s for them to commit the crime. Then look at the stress placed on individuals in their jobs, wondering if they’ll have a job and etc.

Mental Illness:
Everyone who perpetrates an incident of WPV has been perceived to have a mental illness. In most instances, they do. But not in all cases. Please remember that depression, or another health concern can be destructive to someone’s mental health and put them into ‘a dark abyss’ of mental illness.

Perception of disparate treatment:
I haven’t read any incident of WPV, involving co-workers, that haven’t included this aspect of the profile. Motra Transmissions in Phoenix in 2005 is a good example and I’m sure you can name hundreds more. Everyone that I have read/heard about has perceived that they received disparate treatment from co-workers, supervisors, managers, vendors, and etc.

Loner:
Ah, the proverbial ‘lone wolf’. The people who commit these crimes, whether it be at a business, the parking lot, the sidewalk, or in someone’s home will normally be a loner. From sitting by themselves at lunch or on breaks or just never socializing with others at work or when out.
They may sit by themselves and appear to be happy or satisfied, but they aren’t. In some cases they are just painfully, for them, shy. In either event, they shun other people for innumerable reasons.

Anger Issues
This is one that is becoming more prevalent as time progresses. You can see it with the number of shootings committed by teenagers and young adults in shopping malls. They don’t know how to handle their anger so therefore they lash out at whatever is making them upset. And unfortunately sometimes it’s an innocent bystander.
And as in most SV incidents you can blame society and the parents for this one. No child ever fails (or learns to fail) and everything is there for them and them alone. Therefore they having the feeling of entitlement that they can do no wrong and they want what they want.

Other signs:
There are numerous other signs that can profile the potential perpetrator of this crime. In these cases, if you look at the warning signs, then you’ll see many other facets of someone who may become violent in the workplace. From drug and alcohol abuse, addiction to violent music, video games, & movies, and attendance issues.
As with the warning signs, we all have to be able to ‘connect the dots’ and not be afraid to tell or talk to someone about the co-worker, significant other, customer, and etc. Be they a friend or not, someone has to say something and not just ignore or blow off the signs.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

Security is important? Why?

“Security is useless. The only reason we have security around is because they are constantly scaring us into believing that we need them. If we didn’t have security around us, what’s the worst that could happen? If we didn’t spend money on that garbage we’d have more money to grow our businesses!”
Let me tell you why we need security. So, listen up all you managers, business owners, and anyone else who think security is a cost center and doesn’t produce any profit and only drains your accounts.
It is true that security rarely actually adds anything to the bottom line of your company. There is usually nothing tangible to point at and say “We added X amount of $ to the company bottom line and thereby saved you that money”.
But on the other hand you should contact your insurance company and see how much they can save you by hiring security officers or a patrol of your facility. How about adding security equipment so no one can gain access and steal items? And possibly adding the necessary software to prevent someone from hacking in and taking company secrets out of the computer?
All of these can save you more money than you spend on security. And hiring a security company to station officers or patrol your facility a couple of times per night can save you more than that. One client I worked for when I started added more than $30,000 to their bottom line by adding security officers when they were closed.
Workplace violence (WPV) is a very serious issue for any business of any size. It can happen in businesses with as few as 10 employees and obviously large multi-national corporations and the federal government.
Is it a foregone conclusion that you’ll have a crime, violent or otherwise, in your business any time soon? No, it’s not. According to the FBI, crime is actually down, but I don’t necessarily believe their stats.
WPV affects more than 75 million employees a year in the United States. More than 15 million of them are actually assaulted, threatened, or bullied. And if it turns deadly…
If you have 10 employees who witness a murder at your site let me tell you what the financial impact can be. This is an average number of course and every single case will be different. But if you have 10 witnesses and 1 death you could be looking at a hit of around $6.5 MILLION. The question then becomes, how much will your insurance cover?
As for theft in the workplace, most thefts are committed by employees accounting for roughly 81% of all losses. Losses in the retail sector is over $150 BILLION per year! How much lower would that Double Mocha Latte’ be if those losses didn’t occur?
Too many people who are experts in their field are quick to disregard security professionals as simple-minded, plodding, and paranoid fools. Yet, we are expected to treat every word they say as gospel, whether they are speaking proven facts or prognosticating.
Security is as important as a business keeping accurate records of what they’ve spent and earned. In a perfect world, there would be no place for me and the millions of people who provide protection, in one fashion or another, to the world and companies. And that would be okay by me if my job was to go the way of the dinosaur.
Our jobs in security, when done right and with the professional diligence our clients deserve, are vitally important to everyone we are around. In financial and physical terms we need to be here for you and your companies, not to mention your employees.
Where would we be without the police, highway patrol, border patrol, and others in law enforcement? Far up a creek and headed to the ends of the Earth because we don’t have a paddle! They are security for the masses like we as security professionals are to individual businesses.
And like them, we’re here to save your company and bacon from being fried!

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Attitudes that can foster WPV – Part 3

• Communication
For those who are old enough to remember Strother Martin’s statement in the 1960’s movie Cool Hand Luke “What we have heah is a failure to communicate”. One of the biggest bug-a-boos in the corporate world. How well does your company communicate with its employees. You may think that you are, but are you really effective?
Many times changes come down from management without any regard to the problems it may cause. And they really shake up the employees, and even some supervisors. And why does that occur? Because management doesn’t take the time to prepare the employees for the change, if there is time & sometimes there isn’t, and they fail to communicate it effectively.
Much like politicians will tell you that a new bill/law is good for you and then you find out you have to jump through a million hoops to do the same thing you did last week with just one step. Failure to communicate.
Remember that unless you’re working with an office or manufacturing plant that is staffed by those with nothing but MBA’s, then you need to write and communicate on a 6th grade level. Yes I know, that sounds demeaning, however that is the level that is most easily understood in this electronics driven society we live in.

• Unequal Enforcement of Policies
Another thing that may be hard to avoid with your employees, especially if you have one that is eager to please and takes on extra work. This goes to the fact that some employees may not be punished as hard as the next.
But, the one issue with this is that other employees only see the end result after an incident. They don’t see the process in between and why one employee was suspended/terminated and another was only reprimanded.
So you have to be as transparent as you possibly can in the enforcement of policies and procedures. Within a union environment this may not be so hard. But if you have non-union employees then it may be trickier to have that transparency.

• Perceived Unequal Treatment
Ah, that word pops up yet again in this series! The key word here is perceived unequal treatment. Again, some employees will grumble and complain some very loudly, about how policies are so unfair. But that is their perception.
As you may know, I’ve said for a long time that perception is reality. And with anti-Semitic, Christian, Islamophobia, or any other group, it’s hard to change those perceptions.

• Authoritarian Style of Management
One of the items that is slowly going away in most companies. It has been around for thousands of years but will remain in some fashion long after we all retire and are pushing up daisies. This attitude on the part of management is succinctly called ‘My way or the highway’.
In some respects it’s necessary for management to manage this way. When dealing with hazardous chemicals or in the law enforcement/security field you could call it mandatory to act and manage this way, if for no other reason than the personal safety of the officers and other employees.
But for the most part companies are moving towards a more kinder and gentler form of management. Maybe we’ll soon get some of those perqs that you see at Google or Apple. Not likely, but possible.

• Stereotyping
One thing that everyone, and I haven’t met a person yet who will admit it, does on a daily basis. It doesn’t matter how you stereotype, we all do it. We stereotype someone driving erratically as being drunk or high. If someone is wobbling down the street, we assume they’re drunk.
If someone has a speech impediment, we call then stupid. Someone is rude, brusque, and irritated then we say they are angry or mad, possibly ready to blow their top.
Those are all things that everyone will stereotype on a daily basis. And there are millions more. Think about it. How many times have you seen someone acting a certain way and you say they must be…
Stereotyping can be dangerous. The individual may be suffering from a medical condition. They may be hurt i.e. a concussion. They may well just be plain stupid – putting on make-up in the car or trying to get somewhere faster, in the last 2 examples the hospital.

• Conclusion
This post is a little longer than I wanted it to be, but I’m hoping that by reading all of this you can get an idea on how to counteract some of these attitudes in your company and managerial duties. It’s never easy to criticize yourself, but in this case you have to evaluate how you come across to your employees or co-workers. Remember it’s all about perception.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Security Contractor fined 47 Million over WPV incident

In 2010, at the Kraft Foods plant in North Philadelphia, a former employee walked into the plant and started shooting at her former co-workers. She killed 2 and wounded 1.
Because of this incident, U.S. Security Associates, Inc. of Georgia was found guilty of not properly notifying the proper personnel and doing more to stop the woman from doing damage. These can and should have several ramifications for both the security community at large and those involved in workplace violence (WPV). Here are several reasons why;
1. This takes in the flawed aspect of a simple ‘Observe & Report’ philosophy of both contractors and clients.

2. The idea that security officers need more training in WPV and other crisis management tools is evident

3. Since the supervisor is seen on video running and hiding instead of either radioing or contacting someone else, this also needs to be addressed

4. The fact that the officers called only 911 and no one else, not even management or made an announcement is also troubling. But then, what were their post orders?

Now add to this that the verdict, including punitive damages, of $46.8 MILLION should also wake up all companies who use security services and the contractors who provide them. This award is far in excess of the average award.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS, the average award for a death due to WPV, is only $5.6 million and only $1.2 for inadequate security. Then figure the number of employees traumatized by the incident and needing the $30,000 psychological counseling, per employee. Here are a few other col hard statistics that may need repeating;

• $120 BILLION in costs to American business yearly
• 2% of total nonfatal lost work-time injuries are by assault.
• $4.2 billion in costs to American businesses per year in missed days of work and legal costs
• 33%- 66% of employees will leave due to the incident
• $25,000 – $50,000 to replace each employee who leaves
• $50,000 to clean-up and replace office supplies and furniture or more for industrial plants
• 6 – 8 weeks for productivity to get back to 100%

Will these numbers wake up those managers and business owners (or CEO’s) that WPV is a serious issue? I would hope so, but I don’t think it will. And the reasoning is that WPV is still a fairly rare event, when it turns fatal. Only several hundred employees are killed yearly. But if you consider that 15 million employees are assaulted every year, the number grows higher. And lawsuits will result from that number, fatal or not.
Will other juries see this as a reason to begin awarding 8 figure settlements in the future? That is unknown at this point but it should begin to wake up the C-Suite and other ‘bean counters’, that security is vitally needed and money needs to be spent on both increased security and officer training.
And should we think that clients will allow their security providers to twist in the wind and absorb the entire cost of such a large judgement? Again, I sincerely doubt it. And security companies will call upon its insurance, and if the contract is worded correctly, then the client may have to pay at least a share of it. For what you ask?
For not allowing more training and not ensuring that they were trained fully and properly. And that the client gives the officers the right information to complete their duties without people getting wounded or dying. And in many cases the client gives just enough info for the officers to be dangerous and nothing else. Then of course the client blames the officers/company when something like this occurs.
So maybe this will be the impetus for change in the field. Maybe, maybe not. But we can always hope that officers will be more like the protectors they should be and stop with this ridiculous ‘observe & report’ only attitude.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Attitudes that can foster WPV – Part 2

• Supervisors playing favorites
This may sound like a contradiction to the above lecture. But it’s not. There are times, when a manager will get too ‘chummy’ with an employee and it becomes very clear. Some will call this employee a ‘brown noser’ and not be joking. And the reasoning is simple.
The employee is simply playing the manager for a fool, trying to get whatever they can for as long as they can. They have no real interest in the supervisor’s friendship; they just want the perqs that come with being ‘chummy’ with them.
It may also be that the manager and employee are involved in a romantic relationship, which is dangerous enough in the workplace. In this case, who do you trust more an employee who has been with the company for a while or the person you’re dating? Unfortunately, most people can’t separate work and private lives when dating. And that can be very dangerous for the business.
Even if the romantic relationship is making believe and made up. I’ve seen several instances of both men and women making up relationships in their minds between themselves and their managers or subordinates. And if this fantasy gets out of control, then it can become deadly for several people inside the workplace.

• CHH

At this point you may be scratching your head wondering what CHH is. CHH stands for the reason that many businesses get hit with a deadly incident. I have heard so many news stories where victims and other people have stated this phrase emphatically. I didn’t think it could happen here.
The Can’t Happen Here attitude is one of the most dangerous things that a business and its managers can have. If they firmly believe that WPV can’t happen in their business, it’s apparent to me, that they aren’t prepared for it when it does occur,
These businesses and managers are putting their heads in the sand and not seeing reality in the real world. They live in a fantasy where everyone treats everyone else with respect and dignity and no one ever gets mad at someone else. With this attitude it’s only a matter of time until something does happen.
These businesses put tons of lip service into the fact that they are doing things to prevent WPV. They pay a consultant several thousand dollars to write a plan and then they accept it, file it away, and poo poo it as never being needed. And when it is needed it is so far out of date as to be useless.

• NIH
This attitude is just as irritating, to me and millions of others, as CHH. It stands for ‘Not Invented Here’. It is fortunate that in this competitive economy, that this is less of an issue than it was even 5 years ago. Basically, it means that a company refuses to accept any ideas, recommendations, or suggestions from their own staff. It has to be tried and true in another company before they will adopt it. And many times, they adopt it without making any changes and it flops miserably, which should not be a big surprise.
If you take an idea from manufacturing and try to translate it successfully into an office environment, you have to make changes to make it compatible! That seems only logical to most people. But some companies refuse to do this. Which is why it fails and NIH comes into play.
Some businesses are still stuck in the 19th century when it comes to their employees. They don’t believe that their employees, or even their managers sometimes, can have any ideas that are worth even investigating. I know that sounds absurd, but it is true. One example I can cite is the security industry. 99% of the time, if an hourly officer has a good idea; it is ignored by their supervisor or manager. Why, you may ask? Simple. ‘They’re only a guard what the hell do they know!’ It doesn’t matter how good the idea may be.
This actually happened to me more than 25 years ago. . I was working for Wells Fargo Guard Services (long absorbed Securitas). I was writing articles and was invited to help edit a training manual for a general security audience. When trying to get permission from the district manager, I was told succinctly ‘you’re only a guard and don’t even have a degree. What the hell do you know!’ After a little argument, I got permission to use the company name next to mine, which added credibility to the manual.

Look for the remaining posts in this series. I know it’s long and involved, but I’m sure you’d like to read these attitudes so you don’t have any kind of carnage within your company.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Doing Nothing is a Choice

This was the subject of a discussion group on linked in a few months ago. And being honest, and tooting my own horn, something I’ve been saying for a decade, albeit in a different way. We can either choose to act upon or ignore the warning signs of workplace violence (WPV).
But no matter what you decide to do it is a choice. If people get killed or injured during a WPV incident, you have to live with it. And if you had chosen to ignore those signs and not report them, it may over whelm you. So in this respect, doing nothing is a choice, and very possibly a bad one.
There are many excuses or explanations in which someone will tell them, to avoid informing a supervisor or manager, of a potential issue. All the employee(s) are doing is lying to them and putting lives endanger.
They are too scared of the bully or are so intimidated by talking to a supervisor that they just hide away and say nothing. Other times they hate their job and company more than the risk of a WPV incident, and by telling themselves this they put their lives and the lives others in danger.
We are good at lying to ourselves. A great example is politicians. They consistently lie to their constituents and the public at large. But when the momentum swings against them and the adage of ‘Tro the bums out’ begins going around, guess what happens. It’s always someone else’s bum and not theirs!
The same holds true in WPV. It’s always the next company that will get hit. The sweat box next door or the company that refuses to pay union wages. It will never be OUR company. This kind of attitude, something I harp on, is known as CHH ‘Can’t Happen Here. But looking at statistics and past incidents, yes it can.
So what can we do as security professionals do to help combat this attitude and cause nothing not to be a choice? The answer is fairly simple I believe. Build trust amongst your employees so that they will come to you with an issue.
And even if it comes to you anonymously, so what. At least you got the tip that may save lives, families, property, & jobs. Jobs. You ask? Yes jobs. If the company goes bankrupt because of an incident where are the jobs going to go… They go out the door never to be seen again.
Will you convince everyone to trust you with what they tell you. Absolutely not. There will be some employees, especially in a union environment or on the edge that will never trust a supervisor, manager, or a suit from the c-suite. But you have to work long and hard on this.
It’s never easy. While your’re building the trust you’ll be scrutinized carefully to see if you’re following through with your promise. It doesn’t matter if the c-suite made the promise, the front line supervisor or manager is the one being judged on it. And then the least little mess up, or perceived mess up…
Therefore you have to work long and hard to ensure tht doing nothing is not the choice they need to be be making. Doing nothing can cause death and severe disability to any number of employees. And building theat trust is harder than most people think. There are no born leaders, it must all be learned.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Attitudes that can Foster WPV

We have covered the warning signs of an individual who may ‘go off the deep end’ and perpetrate an incident of workplace violence (WPV). However, there are things that employers do that actually contribute to an employee perpetrating an incident.
Read these attitudes dealing with this subject and see if you or your company actually commits any of them. And a caveat to add. All of the attitudes that I’m about to write about can actually just be in the mind of the employee. If that is the case, then you may have a bigger issue to deal with in addition to a WPV incident. One term I coined more than a quarter century ago adds credence to this.
Perception is Reality. All that really matters is that the employee, whoever they may be, male or female, recognizes it as real. Whatever they perceive to be real is real to them. And that could be a significant issue in and of itself.
We’ve learned to recognize the signs and build security systems and facilities to prevent it. We’ve written policies & procedures and given new benefits to employees to combat it. We’ve spent immeasurable dollars in trying to protect against an incident. But we have failed in 2 critical ways. We still ignore the warning signs and contribute with these attitudes.
Is this a definitive list of attitudes that can lead an employee towards being violent or disruptive in the workplace? No. So how do you know what to look out for and train your supervisors and managers against? Read these and learn them. From there create your own list and then watch out for those items. Every industry is different, therefore it’s imperative that you know your industry AND your employees.

Perceived disparate treatment
That word pops up yet again, perceived. This is one of the big ones that employee’s will see. Now while it is not always true, we do treat employees differently. And that’s not always a bad thing. In order to be a good supervisor/manager you need to know your employees and know how to treat each one.
Some employees are slower to learn, hard headed, stubborn, or just plain lazy. In order to get the best out of each and every one you have to deal effectively with everyone’s personality. And while that may not be totally feasible in a union environment, you have to know how to do it.
The supervisors ‘pet’ will receive better hours, pay, perqs, and more lenient application of rules. Now do you necessarily want them to be a pet? No, but they have given everything they could have and more for you and the company.
That means that you will treat them differently in appreciation. If they make a mistake after years of faithful service, you’re more likely to overlook it. And when the chance for overtime pops up, they may get first pick. The other employees may not know all the facts and they see that you’re treating your pet better than them.
So, should you start treating everyone the same and not recognize an employee for excellent service or outstanding work? Of course not. Again, learning how to treat each person as an individual is necessary to being a successful manager. Will it make some people mad and upset at you? Of course it will, but then again you have to learn how to handle that too.

As I stated above, these attitudes we are discussing can cause an employee to ‘go off’ at any time. Remember, it’s all about their perception of what’s happening. If they perceive that they are being lied to or useless platitudes talked to them, then in their mind, they are. And there is nothing you can say or do, at least immediately, to counteract it.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

WPV Numbers for March

Here is the WPV numbers for March. Keep in mind that these numbers are only for the incidents that I hear about in the media. And there are some incidents that I can’t verify are actual WPV and not associated with another crime.
And as before, I’ve included the totals for the year as well as the number of dead and wounded. If you would like to know about these incidents, the briefs are located on my Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany (when you get there, go ahead and ‘like’ it at the same time if you would).
And I’m sure you’ll notice that most of these incidents occurred in Arizona. That’s because living in AZ, I hear about more Arizona than I do national incidents. Unless they are deadly and a mass murder. Otherwise the media doesn’t cover it well, if at all.

Tempe, AZ March 3 1d2w
Madison, WI. March 8 1d 1w
Phoenix, AZ. March 11 3w
Ferguson, MO. March 12 2w
Gilbert, AZ. March 15 1w
Washington D.C. March 17 0
Mesa, AZ. March 18 1d 5w
Red Valley, AZ. March 19 2d 2w
Tucson, AZ. March 19 (school) 0
New Orleans, LA. March 20 1d 2w
Cottonwood, AZ. March 21 1d 18 w
Buckeye, AZ. March 29 0
Ft. Meade, MD. March 30 1d 2w
Elkins Park, PA. March 31 0
Fresno, CA. March 31 ??
March: 15 incidents 8 dead 38 wounded

Total of incidents: 47 Arizona 18
25 Dead 57 wounded

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for nearly 32 years, and 24 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.