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Month: March, 2015

Customer Oriented Quality Service (COQS)

When you think about customer service, you often think only about the quality service given to you in a retail environment. But security, and all other service companies, also needs to be concerned with quality service. And why?
#1 is the fact that the security industry is far too competitive. Many times security providers make less, and the officers as well, than a janitorial company at the same client or company. The person responsible for millions of dollars of property & lives makes less than the person who ensures it’s clean.
#2 would be that our image in the security industry is tainted by those who refuse to have any customer or quality service guidelines. “Here’s your post. Now go out and be a security guard”. And unfortunately these guards don’t get any training or supervision at post, even if they are proprietary.
Yet, quality control/assurance/service is even more critical than any other service security provides. If a security company/officer refuses to provide that quality service it can lead to innumerable issues and problems. And these would include allowing intruders and theft.
Manufacturing, retail, and other service businesses are concerned with costs, the process, and efficiency. That isn’t so in security. It has to be measured through the risks that are or could be faced on a daily basis. In most instances this could be simple theft or inefficiency. But it could also be terrorism or workplace violence (WPV). In the United States WPV is a more likely ending instead of terrorism.
Therefore, you have to look at the title of this post to coming close to understanding quality service/assurance/control. The COQS method helps to ensure that all aspects of the client/company are protected to the highest degree possible. And it’s not easy to do in the competitive edge of the industry.

COQS and Security
Letting the client/company know that they are the reason you’re here
Concentrating on the client/company – customer oriented
Providing customer service in a fair and impartial manner to ALL employees & visitors
Ensuring that our adversaries, whoever they may be (employees or others) do not break thru
Ensuring that the policies & procedures are followed to the best of our abilities – no favoritism
Knowing when and how to be firm but fair
Treating everyone with a courteous attitude – not a cold shoulder
The officer knowing the post or assignment intimately with all its nuances – after learning it of course
The security company providing quality service to its officers
The company knowing the stages of companies that do it right every time
The company having quality control/assurance procedures in place
Continuous follow-up between the company, client, & officers
The officers & company continually testing and being in the forefront of training

Should I go on with this? These are only a few of the items that security companies and officers need to do in order to provide COQS to their client or company if they are proprietary. And as I stated above, few small local providers have even one or two of these.
And it’s not just the smaller local companies. Many larger national companies have forgotten the finer points of COQS. And again I bring it back around to the back-stabbing competitiveness of the industry. And of course it’s not all their fault either.
Clients, and proprietary departments, are constantly demanding that security do more with less. Clients will play providers off one another. Proprietary departments face cuts at every turn.
And why? Because the C-suite and management are short sighted and looking for the bottom line and not the safety and security of their employees or visitors. In any incident of WPV you look at the lack of effective procedures or policies that could have possibly stopped the shooter or perpetrator.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Improving on our security protocols in schools & businesses – Part 2

The last part on improving our protocols:

A few more things we need to do for improving our security protocols;

• Not have knee jerk reactions
In our schools and businesses we have a tendency to have a knee jerk reaction whenever something negative occurs. You can’t manage and work that way. You have to have careful planning in order to try and prevent these things.
We must have common sense in order to plan and see the potential outcomes. The only thing that is affected by a knee jerk reaction is that it makes us feel better that something is being done.
As an example take the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the east coast. The company I started working for shortly after them, First Response, Inc. in Mission KS. Had so many requests for extra coverage they were having a tizzy on how to do them all. They finally had to start turning down extra business, despite the $40 they were being offered – per man hour!
Within 6 months practically every single client dropped their extra coverage that they had gotten. Why, they decided it wasn’t worth the cost. If they had put some disaster recovery plans into effect then none of it would have been required and people would have a lot better –First Response, the officers, & the clients.

• Don’t over react to a small provocation
Yet another example of a knee jerk reaction. We have become overly sensitized to what goes around us and public perceptions, we have a tendency to over react so easily. Again, it comes down to planning and realizing that security is a resource worth having.
And because security is worth having you can’t just say “Oh, we don’t need it anymore” and throw dozens of officers out of work and reduce staff and operations because it costs too much.
Companies need to realize that security is an excellent resource and so is the planning. Having a security strategic plan, they could see that. They need to have a plan in place ready to go as they would during a union strike. That usually means 3 months, or more, of planning.

• Restricting kids and adults from playing
This is one of the biggest things we need to change. Just because a child draws a pistol doesn’t mean he’s gonna blow up the school. Just because an adult starts talking about firearms and how much they hate management or the government doesn’t mean they’ll start shooting everyone at work.
Kids have been playing army, cowboys & Indians, and dodgeball for generations. It encourages playfulness, creativity, and gives them exercise. So why would we want to stop it?
And when adults begin horseplay in the lunch room, as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone or anything, what’s the harm? It helps to relieve tension and stress. And the occasion teasing jibe does the same thing, as long as the recipient doesn’t mind and it doesn’t keep going on.

Blaming everyone else except the main culprits
Far too many times parents will take umbrage at the fact their kid got into trouble. And it usually results in the discipline being dropped or policies being change to accommodate a selected few.
An example of this is what happened at Arizona State University last fall. During a football game the Sun Devils wore all black uniforms for an opponent. ASU called for a ‘black-out’. This meaning that everyone attending, and supporting ASU, should wear all black as well.
A few students painted their faces black in order to pay total homage to the black out and intimidate the other team even more. A few students, 5 I believe, complained. Now you can no longer paint your faces for any reason! So 5 outnumbered 10,000.
People have a tendency to blame the school, management, a co-worker, or the government. Is it really their fault? Or has the blame been misplaced in the heat of anger? Think about it before blaming.

• Common sense
Put the common sense back into your security protocols. If you make a policy or procedure then stick to it for more than a few days and explain why you’re doing it. Don’t take a reaction and say “We’re gonna drop it now because…”
Look at it thoroughly before implementing it, unless it’s an emergency. That’s why planning and having a security vision is so important, to avoid such issues as I’ve addressed in these posts.
Can you prevent everyone from complain and protesting over your new policies & procedures? No. But as a saying I heard decades goes “if both, or all, sides are mad at you, then by golly you’re doing something right” It may have applied to politics, but works just as well here.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

Training for Success

Writing and implementing your security officer training program is not the easiest thing to accomplish. You need to do a couple of things first. Things such as conducting a security survey or risk assessment. Then gathering the necessary materials. Next comes the easier part of creating a program for you and your officers.
When I was writing post orders for the security companies I worked for I followed a couple of examples that hadn’t actually been done before. Every place I worked and every set I read was different. I went to and inspected more than 250 security posts in the 20 years I worked in the field. And literally every single post had a different way of writing them. And this was even among differing sites of the same client! I had a client with 30 sites in Kansas City, each site had a different way of writing them!
The first thing I did was standardize the format. The reasoning for this was simple. If I had to place an untrained officer on a post in an emergency and I couldn’t get there to train them right away, then all they had to do was read the post orders and they’d know what to do.
Take each section, such as deliveries, machinery, access control, & etc. and start writing what they need to know security wise for that section. Keep it in a separate file in your computer until you’re ready to put it all together. Take each detail and break it down to its simplest element and write the steps in exacting order, as best as possible.
The main point on this is using the KISS method of training and writing. ‘Keep[p It Simple Stupid’ is as good as it gets when training people. Keep the security/training manual succinct and concise. Don’t use verbiage that only industry insiders may know. As with newspaper and magazines these days, write for an 8th grade reading level. And it some cases even lower.
With every new segment, start a new section. Don’t run them together in one large end to end format. Break up the procedures and policies into separate parts. And, put a table of contents into it as well. This will allow an employee to quickly find what they want.
Now, you’ve finish your manual. You’ve passed it out to your employees and placed the original master copy in the file in your office. Now what? Do you really think the employees will sit and read your manual and understand it? It’s possible, but not likely.
In this instance you need to start teaching them in person. Before the shift’s start for or the end of it at night, call the officers together. Give them a brief outline of a policy and then tell them they need to read it and understand it.
As you talk and move about your officers, ask them questions about the handbook, and other facility issues. Just a short quick question is all that you need in this instance. Don’t grill them like a dungeon master, just be casual about it.
Every new hire should be put through an orientation training session. In this way, you can ‘indoctrinate’ them into following the security policies and procedures. And then every quarter do it again – at the very least once a year has a formal training session.
Additionally, train your officers in the Socratic Method. This means you ask open ended questions and expect them to come up with the correct answer. If you have to let them sit and stew for a minute or so. Giving them the answer is a last resort when using this method.
Lastly, every time a new policy or procedure is issued, whether from management or security, visit each post and shift and ensure the officers know and understand it. If they seem hesitant, then stay until they do understand. And if you can’t do it personally, then assign a supervisor to do it for you. Security companies have Field Supervisors for this, but you may have to do it for yourself.
Encourage your officers to read and apply, within your policies & procedures, anything they read in a professional magazine, newsletter, or newspaper,. The idea is to be getting them to read professional items while at work or in their free time. Not that they can’t read a fiction novel, but at work is not the right place or time.
Many officers will be reluctant to get trained. Some have been in the field for so long ‘they know it all’. Others will believe they aren’t being paid enough. And yet others will readily accept the additional training.
The key in training your officers is to let them know that they are valuable and that you appreciate what they do. As in customer service they never hear it enough. They usually own hear when an f*** up occurs.
Use every possible situation for training. And every possible angle you can find as well. Postulate a question to them on a regular basis. Stop by at 0100 hours and bring them a cup of coffee or a soda.
Letting them know you are there for them and care about training them and then showing it will help them become more loyal, rewarded, & thoughtful officers. And this will, hopefully, mean you can count on them to actually think like professionals

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Improving on our security protocols in schools & businesses

That is the main and most basic question facing parents, some administrators & teachers, as well as managers & owners. And yet it seems all we do is react to an incident or threat instead of doing something to prevent an incident, whatever it may be.
So what kind of protocols do we need in our schools and businesses to adequately ensure the security and safety of our employees, friends, & kids? Here are a few ideas for implementation;
• Attitudes & mindset’s
This is one of the most basic we can do and yet most of the time it’s ignored. We need to get administration and managers/owners to recognize the issues of security and propose changes that will help the safety & security of the campus, school or corporate.
Another aspect of this is adding layers of administration and managers when they don’t need to be. One thing I railed against when forms were changed or added or deleted back in the working world was simple. ‘Somebody sitting in a windowless little office, in the middle of the floor, with nothing better to do than create silly assed lil forms!’ This is corporate mindset and an attitude it’s better to have a manager than confront the problem
Or worse yet is ‘Let’s study the problem and appoint a committee or task force or thinking group. Never mind the fact that it’s only managers and no one with real world experience or at the front line level is involved. They aren’t smart enough is the signal it sends.
• Physical Security
We need to increase the security in our schools and businesses. It’s as simple as that. ‘We don’t have the money to do that!’ they whine. What’s more important than the kids? Generally, it’s the administrators or managers getting a pay raise. Just look at your own school districts.
You’ll probably notice that the superintendent, department managers, & other administrative personnel get a pay raise. Yet when it comes to the kids they are left in the proverbial cold. The same goes for businesses. The employees will get 2% yet managers get 5%. Why?
That money could be best to go for security systems and other equipment. Security doesn’t have to so invasive that either kids or adults have to think they are in George Orwell’s ‘1984’! But it can so simple to implement and hide that no one will know it’s there until they’re caught.
You don’t have to have security officers at every door. Nor do you have to ID cards on every student or cameras whirring about scanning every inch of the campus, school and business. Are these things valuable? Of course they are, but they don’t have to be intrusive.
In the blogs I’ve written, I’ve given plenty of low cost non-intrusive ideas for security in our schools & businesses. And none of them will be overly intrusive, albeit they will inconvenience some students and employees.
• Stand firm
One of the main issues with improving our protocols is that administration and management listen more to the complaining rather than common sense. When an incident occurs, security comes down tighter than a drum. But after a couple of months it relaxes.
Then it relaxes some more. And then more. Finally you’re left with the same security that helped to lead to the same incident.
School administration and management need to be less wishy-washy in their thinking and help to protect our kids and employees and think about the long term ramifications of changing these newly fallen policies & procedures. If they think of the long term, as in costs and profits, our kids and employees will be more secure and safe than they are now.
Look for another blog on this subject soon.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

Is it bullying or dedicated?

A key buzz word in business today is bullying. We think of bullying as only being in the school yard. Bloody noses, weaker younger kids, and those who are undersized. But now bullying has come into the workplace. Or has it?
Certainly there are adult bullies in this world. All you have to do is look at some the leaders of countries. They are king of the hill and they act like it! And then there are the bullies in our lives as adults.
There is no way that we can deny that we have run into bullies in our everyday lives as adults. One of the biggest that I remember is back in Missouri. Ken Rex McElroy. He was a bully in his small town of Skidmore. He bullied the people and sheriff’s department of surrounding counties for most of his adult life. He got his comeuppance one afternoon. 45 shots into his body at mid-afternoon in downtown Skidmore and no one saw anything.
But co-workers and bosses can also be bullies at work. I had a bully for a boss when I worked for Wells Fargo Guard Services (now a defunct part of Securitas) in the 80s & 90s. His bosses called him driven but in all respects he managed by bullying and intimidation.
But how do you know if you’re boss or yourself are being a bully or just dedicated and driven to succeed? Sometimes the difference is a very thin line easily crossed. And sometimes, like me, we cross that line and don’t realize it. But does that mean we are a bully?

The Difference
Either yourself or your boss can be driven and dedicated to success. And being driven and pressing hard to get the job done, right, can make you an easy mark for being labeled a bully. But ask yourself these questions;
Do you berate or belittle co-workers when they do something wrong?
Do you participate in teasing over a physical or mental abnormality?
Do you yell, scream, and constantly ‘ride’ your employees until they do what you want?
Do you talk down to them?
Are you liked amongst your employees and peers?
Do you allow personal feelings and stress rule your attitude at work?
Do you threaten or intimidate to get what you want?
If you answered yes to these questions you might actually be a bully. Most bullies will never admit that they are bullying someone. Keep in mind that most people who are bullies are doing so by intimidation and being bigger, meaner, and stronger, and in a higher position, than others around them. And they are enabled by management or their peers.
And one of the worst things about bullies is that they remain bullies simply because no one ever calls them out. And if you do try to call them out, report them, or take disciplinary action, you could be looking at a lawsuit or worse being fired.

Being Dedicated
So what is the difference between being a bully and dedicated/driven to success in your job? The following points may help differentiate the two. Look at the above list and compare them to this one;
• Do you apologize when you are wrong? It doesn’t mean you’re a weak leader
• Do you stop unnecessary teasing, especially if it goes on ad nauseum?
• Do you talk to your employees on their level?
• Do you treat them all the same (as humans and not chattel)?
• Do you try to nurture their instincts and work abilities?
• Do your employees know how you want the job done correctly?
• Do you teach and coach instead of push and prod?
• Are your employees knowledgeable about doing the job right?
If you answered yes to these questions you are probably dedicated, driven, and press to get the job done right and not a bully. Keep in mind that you may be accused of being a bully and therefore you will have to defend everything you do and say or risk being disciplined or fired.
Does a good manager have to bully employees at times? Sometimes you do in order to get them to do the right thing. But also remember that if you and your crew are Sympatico, whatever you say needs to be done, they will jump in and do it efficiently and effectively.
We are becoming so sensitive in the United States that maybe we need to take an objective view and not be as quick to jump to the conclusion that someone is being bullied. Not everyone who is accused of being a bully is actually a bully. There are several reasons that someone may on occasion act like one, but their personality doesn’t make them a bully.
Some of us have been accused of being bullies and in reality all that happened is that we are hard driving, dedicated, blunt, direct, and straight forward towards our other employees and clients/customers. And if you present the facts in such a blunt fashion, as I do so as to cut through the bulls***, to someone you could be called a bully.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

WPV Warning Signs & examples – Part 4

• Alcohol/drug abuse
This is always a good sign of someone who might go off the deep end. This is always a bad sign of someone who might go off the deep end. Alcohol and drug abuse can be a useful sign of someone who will go off and begin threatening, assaulting, or otherwise menacing co-workers. But as with all other signs it’s not definitive.
In my younger days I got drunk. It didn’t matter where I was I acted in one of 3 ways. One was I got real ‘handsy’ with any female close by. The other 2 were fighting mode and morose, which defeated the purpose of getting drunk. And unfortunately, left alone like that, there is no one to stop the wild stupid thoughts or actions that run through the brain and cause them to do something stupid.
Drugs are another matter. Driving their car naked, taking off their clothes and walking thru a Wal-Mart Super Center, or possibly just running from the cops and never feeling the dog biting them or the TaSER?

• Poor Health & Hygiene
This is another indicator that someone may be having a rough time. These people will ignore their health and simply get worse as time goes on without seeking medical attention. And they may be in denial over it. Many people will ignore their own health if a member of their family is seriously ill for whatever reason. If a spouse has terminal cancer, then the husband/wife may ignore the signs of a heart attack or stroke.
This can also very easily nosedive into poor hygiene. If the individual is up all night tending to a sick one, they may forget to shower, shave, or put on deodorant. Once a month or on weekends, this isn’t so bad, but if it starts becoming a daily occurrence…

• Safety Issues
If an employee has always been clumsy and has always had safety issues at work, then this is probably nothing to worry about. However, if a truck driver suddenly has a couple of stupid accidents after years of perfect driving and the accidents may just be scraping the truck or knocking over a fence post. Or if a factory worker begins running into things with their forklift or stumbling, fumbling, and dropping items that would be the same thing. It may indicate that something is wrong.
What I mean by all this is that they may have other stressing thoughts running thru their minds and they aren’t concentrating on their job properly. Again, if their spouse has terminal cancer or money issues, or any number of factors could be causing them to lose their concentration on being safety conscious at work.
And some of these can become their own medical issues, of which they may not be aware of. As I have stated before, having a stroke, undiagnosed diabetes, or a myriad of other problems could pop up unexpectedly and cause them to be lackadaisical about safety.

• Obsession With Military/Police tactics
I believe that this one is fairly self explanatory to most of us. If a co-worker suddenly becomes enamored with military or police methodology, then it may be time to worry. Once again, during hunting season, it may not be unusual for a co-worker to become involved in planning their hunting expedition, so that it sound like they’re ready to invade another country. Just keep in mind, that sometimes, people get that look in their eyes during hunting season.

• Unusual or Changed Behavior
This is really the key to everything I’ve said. And it comes down to the people who know the person best, if there is one or to notice changes and act upon them. As a friend or co-worker you need to know when something is wrong with them. And if you notice the pattern of behavior isn’t changing after a day or so, then you need to say something.
And what would I consider unusual or changed behavior in someone? It doesn’t matter what I think or know about your friends or co-workers. I know my friends and co-workers and what would become changed or unusual behavior for them. Only you know them so only you and those around them can distinguish them.
Many people who meet me for the first time think I’m so far off the wall I’m in the middle of a stadium! So they are taken aback sometimes if I get depressed or start acting eccentric. But that is me. Do other people act this way sometimes, of course they do! Is it cause for concern, I don’t know if it is or not.
Use the guidelines I’ve given you and go from there. If you have any doubts about your friend or co-worker, then tell someone.

• Fascination with violent video games, music, or movies
This definitely doesn’t need any explanations. With the plethora of such items out there, people (not just kids and teenagers) can become addicted to the adrenaline high of killing things. And whether it is a game, movie, or rap song they get immune to what they are doing. And sometimes it becomes their reality and not fantasy.

• Conclusion
Keep in mind that not everyone ready to pop will exhibit all of these signs. One of two of these they are probably just going through a hard time. But when the signs start adding up, 4, 5, 6, or more, then you may have a definite problem. And in those cases, you need to ‘nip it. Nip it in the bud!’
I apologize for this last part running on for so long.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

Security Officers: In-House or Proprietary

This is an argument that has been raging for decades. Should you hire your own officers or hire a contract service. There are arguments to both of these. And since I’ve been on both sides of the issue, I feel that I should tell you what I believe is the right choice.
I firmly believe that hiring your own proprietary force is best for any company. And I understand that the contract companies will argue vehemently against this. That is mainly because it would put them out of business, and I wish no one to go out of business.

History
Before the 1870’s security was provided by proprietary forces. Railroads, banks and other financial concerns, as well as some manufacturing businesses hired their own ‘watchmen’. And for the most part they were served well by them Then Allan Pinkerton began his service (now Securitas). After that innumerable services popped up including the Burns Detective Agency (also now a part of Securitas). The original services were very often rude, crude, & lewd. They slept on duty and carried firearms. They were also strike breakers carrying fence posts and other such items to break strikes.
Now there are estimated 20,000 security contract providers in the United States. Most of them are legal, but some of them operate under the radar without licensing and insurance. And some of the smaller ones literally operate nary a penny from bankruptcy. And many offer literally no training.

Contract:
With a contract service you get officers at a moment’s notice – usually. And you also get a management team that is soooo happy to sell you services they fall over themselves to under-cut the competition.
2 examples of what’s bad about a contract service. #1 is that you can have an officer removed at your whim for any reason, legal or not;
Working for a large national ‘guard’ company in the 90’s, I had to remove an officer from a post because they’re a very light skinned black kid with naturally red hair, and the client didn’t want that ‘image’ at their location! I also had to remove an officer from a post at our largest client, a large telecommunications firm because she was too perky!
Other reasons besides the legal ramifications are;
• Lower costs in terms of overtime, licensing, training, vacations, & etc.
• Many times the billing rate will be lower than janitorial services or regular employees
• Not having to deal with the human equation
• Don’t have to worry about scheduling
• If an officer makes a mistake the contractor takes responsibility – mostly
• And a myriad of other details that normally clog HR’s and client contacts day

Proprietary:
With a proprietary force you have so much better control over your force than you do with a contract service. Here are a few of those;
• Diversity – you can hire who you want, white, Asian, black, Hispanic, or Klingon
• You can fire, lay-off, or have disciplined according to your rules – less turnover
• Your force will, more than likely, be more loyal to you and the company
• The training will be tailored to YOUR company/location, which is always better
• Better supervision and management, problems are taken care of quicker
• Better communication between the main office and security force
• Issues and security can be raised within seconds not hours
• And the employees may be more willing to follow rules as well

Conclusion:
There are pros and cons to both sides of this argument. I’ve seen contracted officers so loyal to the client that I had to call in other officers to handle strikes or other emergencies because my officers were too close to the employees.
I’ve also seen proprietary officers know the routine so well that they began stealing from the company. And they were able to take advantage of any negative situation that came along. And sometimes they also became too chummy with the employees
So what should you do? That is a question that only you, and maybe a consultant, can decide. Just don’t contract based on price, which is a very lousy way to depend on anything so crucial.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

WPV Warning Signs &examples – Part 3

• Time Impact
Impacting on supervisory/managerial time will be more pronounced in adults than it is in teenagers. And it will accumulate over a period of time, possibly months. Rarely does an employee take so much time it’s noticeable over a few days or weeks.
One of the things that make a supervisor/manager a good one is the amount of time they spend with their employees. Whether it is in an office or manufacturing plant where you have the same people every shift or in shift work like hospitals and security were you may have different employees every day.
When you have an employee that is beginning to take more time than others, it may be worrisome. This is when one employee begins to have issues and the supervisor needs to spend an ever increasing amount of time counseling, coaching, reprimanding, or just talking to them. And as I said the amount of time will be accumulative.
One week they spend 10 minutes a shift with that person. The next week it’ll be 15, then 20. After a while you may be looking at the fact that one employee is so monopolizing a supervisors time, that they don’t have the appropriate amount of time to give to other employees.
And the discussions could be on a range of work related problems. Attendance issues, not properly shutting down a 50 ton press, reckless driving with a forklift, or courteous behavior to other employees, or any number of other issues.

• Free Expression
There are many forms of free expression in today’s world. If you have someone dancing around a trash compactor, 20 ton press, or an anodizing pool that’s not just unsafe it could be fatal. 2 incidents that I know of, and probably many more, had roots in white and Hispanic workers saying things about black and white co-workers respectively. In the 2nd case they spoke it in Spanish.
Writing, drawing, or some things like this can lead to issues. And again it goes both ways. Do the people who are telling off color jokes or doing something derogatory to a race of people racist or neo-Nazis? No, not necessarily, but their actions need to be addressed.
Consequently, if an employee begins making use of his 1st Amendment rights, but they are turning dark and foreboding, then the same holds true. They need to be talked to and the potential consequences discussed – and not just a warning or threat to terminate.

• Poor Relationship Skills
If you have an employee, who seems to have problems with developing and maintaining a relationship, then watch a little closer. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a relationship with co-workers, supervisors, or dating acquaintances. Anyone one of these, or all three, may be cause for alarm.
Some people just have problems forming lasting relationships with anyone. It doesn’t matter if it’s at or away from work. They just don’t have the skills to have good relationships, no matter what they are.
Many times, these people can be dark and brooding and possibly be the stereotypical loner in a company. They could also just be very shy and not very self confident about themselves or their surroundings. And if that’s the case then it doesn’t matter who or why someone tries to befriend them, it probably won’t work.
Also consider that there are aspects of autism and other mental disorders that can cause someone not to be able to have normal relationships. Or possibly, they have been burned in the past by friends. I know a person, who has been stabbed in the back so many times, because he was too trusting, by so called friends, that it’s very hard for him to even start a relationship much less maintain one!
I also managed a security officer at a large distribution center in Lenexa Kansas that was this way. He was very good at his job of logging trucks in/out of the center. However, he was very brusquest and extremely rude to anyone who supervised/managed him or tried to tell him what to do. However, he was not a big concern for us.
We left him alone to do his job, which always had a 98% pass rating by their corporate people (of which he was rude too as well!). In his off hours, he, his wife, and a daughter took care of 15 special needs children in their home. They were placed there by the state of Kansas and were very lovingly cared for – always receiving a rating of 100%. He got by being rude at his post, because that is what was needed to deal with the idiotic oafs he came into contact with.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you will see and read about other items related to security as well as WPV.

Is the boogeyman out to get you?

The world seems to be such a dangerous place anymore. With ISIS, other Islamic extremists, Russia flexing its muscles, police shooting (justifiably) people to save their lives and the lives of others, sometimes you just want to run and hide.
But that is just what they want you to do. Islamic extremists want you to be so scared that you suffer in your own home. Activists in America want you to be scared after dark, especially if you’re black or in the wrong neighborhood. Others just want you to be afraid of either them or what they can do to you and your family.
And then of course we have the criminals who will invade your home to take what they are too lazy to earn for themselves. And many times these hooligans will terrorize the residents or kill them. And that’s after they beat, rape, or tie you up.
It makes you think the best thing to do is win the lottery and shelter in place until the end of the world comes to claim us all. Then you have to worry about the judgment you get. And of course there is what I write about in these blogs. So are you scared to go out of your home?
You can’t be scared to leave your house, no matter what. In the United States you’re safer than practically anywhere in the world, and in many places that’s because of our 2nd Amendment. In other countries you’re much safer i.e. Singapore where the justice system works very well for them.
I am blind and I’m not scared to go anywhere by myself. But in all honesty I don’t go to the malls. I hated shopping before I went blind so why would I go when I can’t window shop and see all the kids and wonderful things I can’t afford.
When I first went blind my wife bought me a button for my KC Chiefs hat. It says succinctly ‘The dark is afraid of me’. I still mean that. I’m not a self-defense expert, although I know how to ‘street fight’ well. And I walk like many military people I knew back when in high school ‘walk like you have some place to go and something to do once you get there’.
This basically means while walking anywhere, you hold your head up, shoulders straight, and move at a brisk pace. Using my cane it’s not the easiest thing to do because many people still don’t know what a white cane means, but they quickly get out of my way when I come towards them.
And I’ve been told that my walk shows confidence in myself and I know what I’m doing. It’s not always true (but I’ll never admit that!). But it does show that walking that way does something to everyone watching.
I’m not afraid to go somewhere. Nor am I afraid of anyone accosting me. Do I go into the ‘bad neighborhoods’? Only when I have too. Do I confront people unnecessarily? No. But that doesn’t mean I’m afraid of them.
Am I scared to get on an airplane and fly anywhere? No. It’s probably one of the safest ways to travel. Am I scared to ride in the car with my wife on Phoenix’s highways? You damn right I am, these people drive like they’re the ones that are blind!
But the point overall is that we can’t be afraid of crime, terrorists, or other ner’do wells. If we are then they have won. And I personally refuse to let them tell me to stay home and hide in the closet! So I get out and go where I want when I want and how I want. And so should you and everyone else in your house – utilizing the proper security precautions.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, a twice weekly blog, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security field for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

WPV Numbers for February

Here is a listing of the incidents I’ve collected for February. It is by no means an actual counting of the incidents that occurred in the United States, only the ones I’ve heard about. And that is usually because of the news or a tip from friends and colleagues.
Additionally, the total number of incidents for the year as well as those who were murdered and wounded during these incidents is listed at the bottom in the totals. I may come across as an alarmist, or it may shock some people, but it is the truth.
Workplace violence is a serious possibility and affects all Americans in some fashion. Yes, there are greater dangers in the world, however, for the time being WPV needs to be addressed adequately in the United States. WPV is one of the biggest health concerns for American workers, affecting more than half of them.
If you would like to know about these incidents, the briefs are located on my Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany.

Scottsdale, AZ. February 2
Frederick, Md. February 4
Columbia, SC. February 5
Buckeye, AZ. February 4
Chandler, AZ. February 5
Buckeye, AZ. February 9
San Diego, CA. February 10
Laveen, AZ. February 13
IUKA, MS. February 15
Scottsdale, AZ February 16
Phoenix, AZ February 17
Moorestown, NJ February 23
Queen Creek, AZ. February 25
February: 13 incidents 6 dead 7 wounded

Total of incidents: 32 Arizona 10
17 Dead 18 wounded

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.