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Month: December, 2014

Thank you all

It’s the end of an old year and beginning of a new one. Time to take stock of what you have and want to accomplish over the next year. After reflecting on everything I realized the greatest thing to me is my friends and what they’ve given me. And to that, and them, I’m very thankful and felt like I must say thank you in this blog.
This post is just a little thank you to everyone who I owe a debt of gratitude for all the help they’ve given me throughout this past year.
It’s been a trying year for my beautiful wife and me. I won’t go into the details, but suffice to say financial and health issues have dominated us. I have to say thanks to the one who resides upstairs in the heavens for much of the help we’ve been given.
It’s not like in the TV or the movies. The help he has moved our way has been subtle and diverse. The kind of help that many people would say was blind luck or of their own doing and hard work.
And of course those who were moved by him to assist us need to be thanked as well. From close friends, far too many to mention, to the Salvation Army, thanks Len and Major Candy. And how can I leave out those of you who faithfully follow my blog and my tweets! If it wasn’t for you, then I wouldn’t be writing!
In 2015, I will continue to write, speak, train, & consult to try and help save lives and prevent the carnage that WPV and SV makes of survivors, family, and friends, not to mention communities.
Please keep tapping the keystrokes and reading this blog and if you have any ideas for topics, improvements, or whatever, let me know. AND if you really wanna give me a boost…then re-tweet or pass along the address/postings as you wish. That would definitely be very much appreciated.
Again, thank you for continuing to read and have a joyous, wonderful, success filled 2015. And may God bless you as he has us.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Workplace Violence References

Below is a list of security companies, consultants, and others who can assist any business with their security needs in the area of workplace violence (WPV). I can attest they are all reputable and competent companies and consultants. This is by no means a total and complete list, but only the ones that I know and have worked with.
I hope that if you need any assistance in the United States that you could investigate these companies if they are in your area. The consultants/trainers will travel anywhere in the country with few exceptions. I hope you never have a need for them but WPV hits virtually every business at one time or another.

Investigator specializing in open source intelligence
Michele Stewart
JAG Investigations
Gilbert, Arizona
480-988-2580

Security Providers
Michael Morrison
General Manager
Shield Security & Patrol Services
480-434-0909

Anderson Security Agency Ltd.
Debbie Anderson
Arizona & Nevada
602-331-7000
Andersonsecurity.com

Blackstone Security Services, Inc.
Jeanne Croft Executive Vice President
Arizona
602-265—6160

Criterion Healthcare Security, Inc.
Jerry Higginson, PCI, CPP
Branch Manager
Arizona and surrounding
602) 251-8101
http://www.criterionsecurity.com

SecuraGuard, Inc.
Daniel M. Kaufmann
Operations Manager
602-354-8900
http://www.securaguardusa.com

Rockwell Security
Jeff Taylor
Overland Park, KS
Missouri/Kansas/Nevada/Louisiana
913-362-3300
http://www.rockwellsecurity.com

First Response, Inc.
Mission, Ks.
Missouri & Kansas
913-384-5999

Allied-Barton Security
Offices Nationwide
Phoenix Number
602-381-1795
Nationwide
866.825.5433

Consultants & Trainers:
Carol Fredrickson
Violence Free
Nationwide
623-242-8797
http://www.violence-free.com

Corporate Security Specialists
Don Hasslebrock
480-905-9270
http://www.cssisecurity.com

Felix P. Nater
Nater Associates, Ltd.
1-877-valu-101
http://www.naterassociates.com

Michael Betten, CPP
Shawnee, KS
913-515-6644

Robert D. Sollars
Scottsdale, AZ.
480-251-5197

Conflict Resolution
Insight Employment
Amy Lieberman
Scottsdale
480-246-3366
InsightEmployment.com

Publications
The Workplace Violence Prevention eReport – 6 times per year
W. Barry Nixon, SPHR
Executive Director
National Institute for the Prevention of Workplace Violence, Inc.
949)770-5264

One is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace Violence
Robert D. Sollars – 2014
Most e-book formats or hard copy by contacting Robert

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

A Special Christmas Note

I hope you all enjoy a wonderful and merry Christmas. I will be posting no other blogs this week. I will resume posting on Monday the 29th. I will continue to post WPV updates on my Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany.
The simple reasoning for not posting this week is that it should be a happy time and I don’t want to spoil your happiness and, hopefully joyous, holiday with this depressing and dark subject.
So once again, have a wonderful, joy, and family filled Christmas season. And write or call me if you have any issues with security or WPV.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

So It Doesn’t Affect You?

50% of all employees are affected by workplace violence (WPV). And worse, 10% of all employees are assaulted, either verbally or physically, at work every year.
You say those numbers don’t affect you at all because it’s never happened in your place of employment. Besides you and management both agree ‘It Can’t Happen Here’, right? Unfortunately, it does and probably has happened to you.
However, if you look at the group most likely to perpetrate an incident, I’d wager that mst people in the company would know them. That’s because it’s a former or current employee. And that person may be a friend or close aquaintence. And you may be targeted because you’re happy and still working.
There are several things that can cause or help to prevent an incident. And you have read these over the past month or so. The Power of Documentation (November 12) can assist in both the termination and increased security costs. Then there is the Corporate Culture(November 12 &21).
Then there is the economic factors to consider if you don’t want it to affect you. Each act of fatal WPV will cost the company more than $5.6 million per employee. If multiple employees are murdered, then the cost can easily rise to well over $15 million. And this doesn’t reflect the associated costs!
What are those you ask? Let me elaborate a bit with a couple
• Replacing windows or doors
• Replacing carpet
• Repairing walls
• Cleaning up blood stains and etc.
• Replacing machinery or other instruments
• Increased insurance costs
• The shut down of the facility/business for seveal days
Is that enough to convince you? It can affect your pockets and your ability to provide for your family. And if you happen to be the one murdered… how will the family keep going without your income and livelihood?
WPV is one of those things that every employer dreads yet avoids because they do not know how to deal with it. And ignoring it and sticking your head in the sand like an ostrich just doesn’t work. There are plenty of lawyers out there that would love to get you on the witnesss stand and have you explain why you didn’t do anything to prevent an incident.
As our culture in the United States continues to move towards a more ‘Me First’ attitude and becoming divided over socio-economic-political issues, the more likely that WPV will also continue to grow. And with that we have a multitude of mothers, fathers, siblings, wives, husbands, and children will be left without a loved one and wondering what went wrong. Do you wish to see them on TV crying about someone they loved?
The number of WPV incidents will continue to grow from the 15 million to who knows how high. And it will come from the reasons and warning signs that exist now. What we as business owners and security professionals need to do is simple;
• We need to learn to recognize the warning signs
• Increase the security of our business
• Teach the issue to employees
• Work with anyone who can help us prevent an incident

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

What actually constitutes WPV/SV?

When I first started talking about what I perceived workplace violence (WPV and school violence (SV) to be I got some very quizzical looks. And I could feel that some were ready to put mne in the looney bin. This was mainly because my views were about 4 years ahead of the public and even some security professionals.
One thing that I believe we can all agree on is the fact that WPV and SV can happen to anyone, at any time, for any reason. The one thing that most people have a hard time wrapping their minds around is the fact that it can happen any where as well.
And yes I mean any where. And I’m not talking just about the business or school campus. Quite the contrary, I’m saying that these violent incidents can happen even away from the campus or business property. I have numerous incidents that were perpetrated away from the business and school campus, but were related to those places.
In 2012 in Peoria, AZ. A man threw 2 pipe bombs into the driveway of another man hoping to ignite an explosion of the vehicle parked there. Why? Because both men had been arguing and feuding at work for a number of years. This is WPV
And how many times have you heard about a student being beaten up on a school bus? How about on the way home from school? An incident in Kansas City, MO. Illustrates my point.
3 teenagers had been arguing at school over something. 2 of the teenagers went to the other boys home, aftert school, and set him on fire in retaliation. That is SV.
So many WPV and SV incidents are completely swept under the rug, and the publics eye, because they occur of property. And the media doesn’t report them as such, nor are they included in the official government statistics. All because of where they occur.
If it starts or ends because of an event at work or school, then it is an incident of WPV/SV. If the argument started at a park on the way to school and then boils over at school, it’s SV. If an disagreement between co-workers and neighbors happens at work and then they get into a fight at home because of it , it is WPV.
The question, other than explanations of what WPV/SV really constitutes, iswhat the actual economic cost to the business, employees, and other American businesses. The cost goes much higher if you include these events. They are just as much the issue as theother incidents.
As security professionals, we have the power to at least try and help our kids and co-workers while they commute or at home. We can offer advice on safety and security and even help them resolve the issue, through HR, EAP, or other assistence.
Are we afraid of being sued by helping too much? Are we afraid of becoming the target? Are we just plain of afraid of anything we can’t put our fingers on and control?I think the question should be if we’re afraid of not doing enough to protect them. HR, management, & legal need to understand that if we do help by offering advice, then we can avoid employee/student problems later. And before you begin scoffing remember my favorite business book ‘If it ain’t broke, break it!’

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

How well do YOU serve the internal customer?

How many times have you heard that you MUST service the customers? How many customer service workshops or seminars have you had to endure? I can feel and hear your yawns from here!
But it took my own reading and learning to find out about servicing the internal customer, and more importantly who they actually were. So this post is intended to attempt to show who the 5 sets of internal customers are that you deal with, nearly at least, every day.
And yes, I said 5 sets of customers within your business that are internal customers. You’re probably wondering who they are and why there are that many sets that you have to deal with every single day at work and sometimes away from.
It’s never the easiest thing to do. We have a tendency to forget about these people as customers, but they are just as necessary to service as your external customers that pay you for your product or service.
And even more confusing is the fact that some of them are both internal AND external! And after I’m done, I have no doubt you’ll say to yourself ‘I knew that’, but you just didn’t think of it that way.

Client or customer.
Depending on where you work, these can be considered an internal customer as well as an external. If you don’t keep this group happy, you won’t be in business for long.
And especially depending on the service you offer they have to stay happy and satisfied. With retail and wholesale, it may not be so hard. But if you offer a service, then the criteria are very subjective and their satisfaction is not necessarily objective.
And they can be both internal and external. You may ask how that’s possible and it’s simple. If you are a contract worker i.e. security officer at a client facility you need to treat them as both. Usually if you’re a contractor and you work at a client facility exclusively, or close to it, then you need to think about them as such.

your client/customer employees
Yes their employees. If you make the customer happy that’s fine, but if their employees aren’t happy with you – whether it’s your fault or theirs, it doesn’t matter.
In security you have to follow the client’s rules, policies, & procedures. That almost immediately, puts you into conflict with the employees. It’s a fine line to walk, but you have to do what you can to keep them happy and enforce whatever it is the client wants.

vendors/delivery people
Oh, them. It is vitally important that you keep your vendors and delivery people happy as well and service them just as well as you do anyone else. Happy and satisfied as well. Again, they will also be a combination of internal and external customers.
If you are satisfying their needs of being an internal customer, as well as external, then you can be assured that you will more than likely get better cooperation from them. These people may be employees of the client or actually maybe external.

your employees
If you don’t care about your co-workers, then who will. You don’t have to be best buds with them, but you do have to satisfy their needs and help them get off on the right foot. Whether they are relieving you for a shift or they expect you to complete a chore so they can get theirs done doesn’t matter.
These people depend on YOU to take care of them. They depend on you to do your job and do it right. They depend on you to get things accomplished.
And if you just stop and think about how many of them there are… For example in a hospital; housekeeping, nursing staff, doctors, radiology, surgery, dietary, security, admitting, emergency room, and …should I really keep going?

So now we come to the last set of people, actually one person that you have to satisfy on a daily basis. It’s easily the most overlooked and ignored group on the list. Yourself! If you don’t service yourself and keep yourself happy you can’t keep anyone else happy and working towards the ultimate goal, which is of course to grow the business and the company to be successful.
And it doesn’t matter if you own the company, even a sole proprietorship or just work for it. If you don’t satisfy these different sets of customers, then your business/company is lost. It will circle the drain and go down where the coffee grounds go. The sewer.
Take care of these customers/clients and you’ll be ahead of the game no matter what business you’re in. It can be retail, wholesale, a warehouse, service, or even, heaven forbid they think about this, governmental agency.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Stop Blaming the Police!

In the past year there has been a plethora of incidents involving the police using their firearms, as there is every year. But I have noticed a different tone with shootings involving the police this year. It’s always the officer’s fault that the individual got shot and, usually, killed.
In 99% of all cases the officers were justified by their actions in firing their pistol. They did it in accordance with the ‘Use of Force’ policies that all law enforcement and security agencies are obligated to follow. So why are we constantly blaming the police for doing their job.
The police officers on the street are not there because it’s a safe and comfortable job. They are there for one reason. They want to protect the public from harm, whatever that may be. And sometimes that includes laws we don’t necessarily agree with. But I can guarantee you we may not like it, until we need them!
Here is a partial list of recent incidents in which police were blamed for some sort of misconduct when they were actually doing their job and/or the individuals were being stupid and acting like idiots;
The 13-year-old boy in Santa Rosa, CA. who was carrying a replica AK-47. The sheriff’s deputy asked him to drop the rifle, from approx. 30 yards away. Instead he raised it, barrel first, towards the officers.
The 12-year-old who was shot and killed carrying a realistic looking air pistol near a playground in Ohio. It had no orange tip on it identifying it as a toy. And when told to drop it, reached for it, and this was after 3 commands to drop the weapon.

Ferguson, MO. A police officer fearing for his life with a 6’4”285 lb. 18-year-old assaulted him in his vehicle and attempted to take his weapon.

In Mississippi, a car load of underage youths who were pulled over for speeding. When approached by the officer, they sped off. They then turned onto another road and slammed into a tree killing a 15-year-old girl. None of the teens had a license and the car was stolen. The officer did not have time to start a pursuit of the vehicle.

The mother who blamed 2 uniformed Phoenix police officers for the death of her son, who had jumped off his bicycle and shot at the officers, striking one. When cornered he committed suicide. This 20 something had spent 8 years in prison for a drive by shooting and was a known gang member.

These are just a few of the incidents that I can name off the top of my head. And isn’t it just ironic that every single victim of the police was innocent and did absolutely nothing wrong? And it was the police officer who was using brutality and other such Gestapo tactics to kill these poor innocents?

By blaming the police when they don’t deserve it, we are setting ourselves up to disrespect authority and turning to anarchy. Yes, I’m a firm backer of law enforcement. And 99%, if not more, of the officers and agents that are on the street do absolutely nothing wrong. Now do they ever pull their weapons.
Yet as the old phrase said one bad apple spoils the whole bunch. Because one officer does something wrong the entire 3 million, or more, law enforcement officers are all bad.
If an officer does something wrong, and it’s proven, I am usually the first one to say, figuratively, hang’em! But for all the rest, they do a job that literally only 1 in 12 million attempts. They are the ones who take bullets for us and help people trapped in burning cars when the fire department hasn’t arrived yet.
So before we blame the law enforcement officer who kills another person by accident we need to ask ourselves, especially the parents of these idiots, ‘What did my kid do to provoke the officer?’ Not the easiest thing to do when grieving, but one that is necessary. And friends and family also need to ask this question without throwing verbal bombs at the departments and calling racism and unjust.
As a side note, all of the victims above were either black or Hispanic. Not one case, outside local newscasts will it be reported that a white person who did the same thing make the national media.
Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Essential Tips to prevent WPV

There have literally been dozens of articles in 2014 on essential tips in preventing workplace violence (WPV). The only unfortunate part of this is that they leave out far too many parts of a comprehensive plan!
Now while I’m not going to try and teach you everything in building a comprehensive plan in preventing WPV, I will outline the many necessary tips in building your plan.
And one thing to keep in mind for every person and business reading this. No 2 businesses are alike. While a carpet cleaning company may be the same down the street, yours has unique properties to it. Take these tips and ‘tweak’ to your business. Cookie cutters are only good for outlines, no matter what anyone says.
Start with the hiring process and we’ll progress from there. Now this list may look like it’s long and complicated. Preventing WPV is not complicated. It is, however time consuming and detail oriented.
• The application – ask good questions that require answers not checks
• The interview process – ensure more probing questions are asked AND answered
• Ensure your background checks are done – as deep as the law allows for the job you’re hiring for
• Always use a probationary period
• Training the employees in knowing the rules and WPV
• Ensure that you complete security survey’[s & assessments at least every 6 months
• Review your security policies & procedures at least yearly or as necessary (after even a minor incident)
• Train your supervisors/managers in the Disaster Recovery Plan and other emergency plans
• Ensure you have a Threat Assessment Team/Group in place
• Review and delete/change/revise your HR policies & procedures at least yearly – the same as security
• Conduct WPV active shooter drills at least yearly
• Ensure your employees are fully versed and knowledgeable in the active shooter plan
• Ensure your employees know how to report threats, bullying, harassment, & etc.
• Know the warning signs of employees who may potentially violent
• Learn, know, and enforce customer service techniques to all customers internal and external
• Get rid of those ‘zero tolerance’ policies
• Keep your physical security plan up-to-date – review at least yearly
• Review and revise your DRP at least yearly

Have I given you enough to think and worry about? Put your plan in place and then keep it within ready reach to add, delete, revise, any time it is prudent, and that would usually be after something happen that makes you take pause.
This list I gave you above may seem daunting, and it should! WPV is a serious threat and problem in business. It will cause many more issues if an incident occurs than the time and detail it takes to write your plan.
If nothing else hire a consultant to assist you in writing your plan. There are thousands of consultants that are available to assist you. One caveat to this is that the consultant should not be affiliated with any product or other service nor should they be consult anting in anything but WPV or security issues.
Yes, hiring a consultant can be expensive. As much as a $1,000 per day plus expenses for a highly regarded and internationally known one. You can also find consultants that may be just as good at $200 per day plus expenses. Ensure that the consultant is familiar with your country and its laws.

Robert D. Sollars is a 31 year veteran of the security field and has spent more than 23 years writing, studying, researching, consulting, and speaking about WPV.
He is an accomplished writer having published 2 books on preventing violence in schools and business, as well as numerous media appearances and this blog and articles. His latest book is entitled One is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace Violence. It is available for most e-book formats.
If you wish to hire Robert or learn more about WPV, contact him at his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany. Here you learn more about WPV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

The Media & coverage of WPV

The media and workplace violence (WPV), it’s kind of a love/hate relationship I believe with them, no matter which medium, and violence in a business. It used to be that the media was all over a WPV incident, no matter how small.
Now, the reporting of a WPV incident is still reported but unless it involves multiple shooting victims it’s soon forgotten, should I mention Marysville WA. And the mass shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School? And the media reports WPV in practically every newscast they just don’t call it that.
A couple of recent examples are as follows;
*The 68-year-old man in Minneapolis who attacked nurses with an IV pole in a hospital
*The veteran in Norman, OK who took hostages and released them a few hours later
*The cop who was attacked sitting in his patrol car in Washington D.C. with an axe
*The employee who set fire to a Dollar General store in Rostraver Township, PA
*The active shooter threat, a hoax, at the Boeing plant in Everettt, WA.
How many of these incidents did you hear about? I would venture to say that most of you didn’t hear about any of them. And if you did it was only one. To be perfectly honest, I heard about most of these late night on the ABC Radio News, between 0100 and 0400 MST.
WPV gets reported every single day, as I stated above. But unless it is a mass shooting it’s not reported very well. It’s a trap that all media fall into. I believe it harkens back to the gun control debate is the reasoning behind it, and even FOX has to report it as such because of the ratings race.
So, while the reporting may be down, at least in the public eye, WPV is just as prevalent as ever. I again refer to the study completed in 2006 by the University of South Florida. It stated that more than 15 MILLION employees are actual victims of WPV every year.
But again, since most of these involve threats, harassment, bullying, and the like, it rarely gets reported. Remember what the Ebola scare did for us just a few short weeks ago?
If the media turned their powerful eyes and reporting to the WPV incidents then I believe, we could really bring attention to it. Much like the Domestic Violence issue of just a few weeks before Ebola.
I shall now get off of my soapbox and say I am happy that the media reports these stories, but I just wish they gave more attention during reporting to bring attention to the problem.

Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.
His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.
He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/oneistoomany, Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.