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Month: August, 2014

School Violence Prevention – Training

We’ve explored several aspects of school violence in the last couple of posts. Now for the last part of the puzzle. Training. Along with the recognition of the warning signs attitudes and physical security training may be the most important part of preventing violence in our schools. And trust me it’s not as easy as you may think to do this. The main reason being who it is we have to train!

                Administrators and parents are readily willing to learn about active shootings and the idea of blaming others for the problem. But when it comes to blaming themselves, well … it’s not that easy to convince them. So, the brief synopsis of what needs to be trained on, who needs to be trained in it, and how you need to train them is listed here;

 

What needs to be taught:

  1. Warning signs – and this means not to allow them to poo-poo the idea of what the warning signs mean.
  2. . The attitudes that can cause disenfranchisement
  3. . Communication between teachers, administration, parents, & students. This is one area that absolutely has to be done.
  4. . Understand that there is no such thing as deniability anymore. Administration, teachers, parents, & everyone else need to understand this and use #3.
  5. . Zero tolerance doesn’t work. Zero tolerance is a way to avoid responsibility and not think about the ‘potential incident’. A way to dispense with the problem that may not be.
  6. . Security measures that isn’t secret. Do they need to know everything? No, but they need to assured that the school is safe – without being lied to.
  7. . Disaster/active shooter plan outlines – the same goes here as for #6

 

Who needs to be trained & How

  1. EVERYONE! From students (kindergarten to seniors), parents, teachers, support staff, & administration.
  2. . Classroom style in a comfortable way. Serve coffee or water. Don’t let it be a ‘bitch’ session atmosphere
  3. . If questions aren’t forthcoming, then use the Socratic Method, ask them questions and make them think.
  4. . Utilize the KISS Method as well
  5. . Use handouts as reference materials

 

So, how do we protect our kids while they’re at school? Keep in mind that no matter what we do, a child can always be killed at school due to another student. Even turning our schools into armed camps wouldn’t stop it all. Even pencils, staplers, and  other such common materials can be used as deadly weapons.

 

                 Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

 

School Violence Prevention – Physical Security

This is indeed a tough idea to try and convey in just a few hundred words. There are literally, dozens, possibly hundreds, of books on securing an educational institution. And all of them have their points.

                I am going to attempt to boil it down into these few words with the most practical, effective, & efficient (both financially and time wise) for you.

 

  • The first point I want to make, and reiterate, is that parents need to be involved with security for the school. They don’t need to know everything, but if they are a concerned parent then let them ask the necessary questions. As with all good security, you don’t need to disclose everything.

                Should you be concerned with the questions about your security plans and other security related items? Of course! But if they happen to be a security professional, then you can ask for and get their input from a security standpoint. Even is the district has a security manager, what would it hurt to get another view of your security plans?

 

  • Don’t lie to the parents or the press. In the Phoenix area, I approached a district several years ago. T was told, extremely succinctly, that they had o issues. The next week a 14-year-old was arrested for filling a backpack with weapons to ‘solve a 4th hour problem’.

 

  • All doors should be locked at all times that school is in session. With the allowance that ‘crash bars’ on the doors for emergency exit. AND NEVER allow them to be propped open by anyone for any reason.

 

  • Ensure that the glass in the side lites of the doors is not wide enough for someone to break and then open the doors from inside. The only failure in security at the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in 2012.

 

  • Access control – Everyone who enters the school needs to be required to go to the main office and get a visitors pass – even delivery drivers for the kitchen. This would also include visitors, deliveries, salesmen, and etc.

                Another aspect of this is to attempt to funnel all the kids through one door when school is ready to start. This may not be very feasible with many older buildings, but then a teacher needs to be present at every entry/exit door before they are locked when the bell sounds.

                And at that point then all doors need to be locked except the front door, which, ideally, will open into the main office or a highly visible space for a security officer or receptionist can see who wants in.

 

  • CCTV systems should also be considered. And never go for the cheap ones that you can get at Costco or Sam’s Club. They are efficient; however they are also not effective in identifying intruders or vandals after hours. A high quality system is a must

 

  • Lock up all hazardous materials. This may sound like elementary stuff, but you may be surprised at the explosive proof cabinets that are left unlocked and open

 

  • Disaster Recovery Plan. This is an absolute must, and not just for a potential active shooter situation. You must also include if you want the kids to ‘run, hide, fight’ or evacuate the building.

 

  • Get rid of those idiotic, ridiculous zero tolerance policies. They are a simple excuse to not do the job that the administration or district people should be doing. Too many times a kid bites his pop tart into a firearm and plays cops & robbers or army. Then they get expelled and ruin their academic career with a black mark that was stupid and foolish.

 

Are these all the measures you can take? Not by a long shot, but it’s a start. We can always install 10 foot brick walls with concertina wire, guard towers, double vehicle and pedestrian gates. Hand wand and pat down everyone entering the campus and install GPS in every students backpack or arm.

                But will that make them safer from a murderer? Yes, as long as the murderer comes in from outside, but what of the butter knife in the cafeteria? And do we want our children trying to learn in an armed camp? Probably not so what’s the solution? Training, training for everyone from resource officers to teachers to parents to the lunch ladies. Good physical security measures that are not too intrusive and most importantly knowing our kids.

 

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

 

School Violence Prevention – Attitudes

This is the one post that many people don’t want to read. Or if they do, they will simply say to themselves ‘I/we don’t do those things’. Unfortunately, those are the people that probably are the worst offenders and are courting a bloody disaster.

                And it’s just as much the parents as well as school administrators that have these attitudes that cause school violence as the students. And I know the incredulous look you’re doing at your computer screen/phone. But hopefully, you’ll recognize your kid, or other parents (or yourself) as you read over these and take steps to prevent them. So, here are the most prevalent attitudes that will encourage a kid on the edge;

  • NIH (not invented here)
  • CHH (can’t happen here)or Ostrich syndrome
  • Communication
  • Unequal enforcement of policies/procedures
  • Perceived unequal treatment
  • Authoritarian style of administration- it needs to be strict, but flexible
  • Stereotyping

Those are for the kids, teachers, & administration, but what about the parents? There are several ways that parental attitudes can get into the violence act as well. And most parents will never realize it, mainly because of having CHH;

  • Not My lil angel
  • Helicopter parenting – let the kids fail and learn
  • Denial of a problem, akin to not my lil angel
  • Living in a Fantasy World- it has to be different ‘just for my kid/me’
  • Continual excuses

How many parents do you see like this when taking your child to school? Or possibly at the PTA meetings or extra curricula events? If you look long and hard at yourself and others, I’m sure you can see it too.

                Being realistic, all parents want the best for their kids in school. And we are  ALL  want the best for them and are willing to look past some minor imperfections and stand up for them. But sometimes, it blinds us to a larger issue that needs attention.

 

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

School Violence Prevention – Warning Signs

                My previous blog showed you a potential scenario of a mass shooting at a school, with plenty of obvious warning signs presented. Now the question is what are the warning signs. Here is the list I’ve collected over the past 23 years. Keep in mind that you may come up with better descriptions and more signs. I don’t pretend to have all the answers or that this is the ‘definitive’ all inclusive list;

  • Threats veiled or overt
  • Poor relationships
  • Bullying – both being the bully or being bullied
  • Cruelty to animals
  • Poor health & hygiene
  • attendance problems
  • Inconsistent work habits
  • Impact on teachers/counselors/administration/parent time. It builds gradually over time
  • Unusual or changed behavior- not so unusual for a teen but…
  • Safety concerns(tripping and running into things
  • Sudden fascination with weapons
  • Drug or alcohol addiction and don’t forget prescriptions and inhalants
  • Violent music, video games, movies, television, & other entertainment
  • Unshakeable depression
  • Continual Excuses
  • Serious stress in personal life
  • Concentration problems
  • Free expression
  • Mental illness – one of the hardest to spot
  • New Religious Fervor or political affiliation
  • Obsession With Military\Police Tactics

I feel the need to reiterate here that one or two of these signs are probably a teenager being a teenager. However, when these signs begin to add up and you have 6, 7, 8, 10, or more then you should begin to worry. Especially if they occur over a short period of time.

                Now the question becomes how do you know how to recognize these students, how do you prevent another Columbine from occurring at your school? The answer is simple and yet very complex and at the same time difficult to ascertain.

                The easy answer is to encourage people to ‘see/notice something say something’. It is becoming so cliché at this point, but it is your most effective weapon in preventing an incident.

                The next part of the blog will talk about the attitudes that can actually encourage violence in your school.

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

School Violence Prevention – A Scenario

 

A beautiful autumn day.  The sun is shining, birds are chirping, and the laughter of young voices carries across the grass. They are all oblivious to the coming storm that is about to envelope them.

 

The class loser is walking towards them with an angry scowl. He’s wearing a long overcoat, but that is nothing unusual. He’s been in a sour mood since his sophmore year, when his parents got divorced and his dad moved to the east coast. His class attendance has slipped and he’s even been expelled once for bringing a knife to class and making threats.

Since then, he’s become a loner, and even started wearing Goth clothes although he doesn’t hang with or even like them. A recent fascination with all sorts of weapons has startled his mother, but she’s working 3 jobs to keep them fed and housed. And the neighbors seem to be losing their pets lately.

                A few of his friends know that he’s been sick a lot to. But they don’t hang out much anymore because he rarely takes a bath or uses deodorant. And he gets defensive if you try to talk to him. He’s also been seen with the ‘druggies’ as of late.

                And he’s been tripping and walking into stuff a lot. And on top of that, his grades are not consistent from week to week or even day to day.

                He walks into the comman and hunkers down, his scowling look making him a path. He walks into a group of students waiting for the bell to start class. Someone remarks that he stinks. He bellows a gut-wrenching yell, throws back his coat and unloads a stream of 9mm hollow points into the one who said it.

                An instant of stunned silence falls before the depths of hell pounces its rage out on another high school. When it’s all over dozens lay dead and wounded, including the shooter.

                The blood splatter on the wall and removing the carpet is easy. Restoring the sanity of students and parents will not be. And what do you tell those parents when they show up at the school or hospital?

                Fortunately, this is a scenario that most of us as security professionals will never have to face. But it’s just as frightening even if the chances are remote.

                As security professionals, we plan for such events on a daily basis. We train, read, organize, and attend seminars. We plan and meet with administrators. We try to encourage good security habits amongst the staff. Simply put, to do our jobs. And still it happens. In December 2007 Junior Achievement, in conjunction with Deloitte and Touché, released a survey with some startling statistics. The survey , which was intended for the workplace but translates well to our schools, stated the 39% of 13 to 18 year Old’s believe that that lying, stealing, and cheating were acceptable ways of getting ahead in life.

                That’s startling enough, but 23% said that some level of violence against a co-worker is acceptable. If it is acceptable against a co-worker, what does that make it against another student?

 

                Most of us would have seen the warning signs in the scenario I started with. But, over a period of a few years, would we just accept the fact that that student is who he is and leave him alone? I point them all out here and they are easy to see. The warning signs are always there no matter what anyone states or believes.

                Does this mean that every kid that discovers an interest in Goth attire and make-up is a candidate for a Columbine style attack? No. Some kids are just in the process of discovering themselves and need a little latitude. Latitude yes, alone time and being a loner. NO.

 

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

 

Post Orders: Writing them efficiently and effectively

 

One of the many duties that I acquired in my 20 years working with several security companies was the idea that the post orders for every client needed to be Written and updated. So, when I was tasked to do that I began by standardizing each book.

                This wasn’t always an easy thing to do. Some sets of post orders hadn’t been updated in more than 5 years! That made it difficult for any security officer assigned to a new post to understand what was going on. And worse, the amount of ‘Wite-out’ and red/black/blue marks through outdated paragraphs and so on were even more confusing. In some books, there was more blacked out that was printed! It made the post orders look like testimony to a ‘Select Senate Committee on Aliant Encounters’! More was redacted than was visible. Now how the hell are they supposed to learn with that?

                As I stated I standardized the post orders for every single post we had. From Wells Fargo with 15 (in the 80’s), to Allied with 45 accounts to First Response with 35. And the ones I did with Allied were still being used 10 years later when First Response took over the Dodson Group.

 

What to Utilize:

                I never called them post orders after Wells Fargo. I began calling them ‘Security Operations Manuals for …’ This made the officers/client think that they were actually better than they were before. And in doing so, it helped to make the officers stand a little taller and take their assignments a tad more seriously. And in this aspect, it helped for them to be more respected by the client’s employees and the client, because of the professional look it had.

                As with training classes, I utilized the KISS method when writing the post orders. I kept them simple for several reasons. #1 was ease and simplicity in finding something that needed to be accomplished. #2 was so that if an officer had to take over and work an account with only a couple hours of training, then they could read the post orders and quickly, effectively, and efficiently work the post, it wouldn’t be perfect (nor is the idea of only a couple ours training), but it would suffice, in most cases.

  • General Orders
  • Policies & Procedures for both the client and company
  • Code of Ethics/conduct
  • Laws, regulations, and other necessary items
  • Emergency call lists
  • Anything else that may have been necessary for the post/assignment

 

Post Orders:

                So now we come to the actual post orders themselves. What do you include in there and where? Again, it can be a little detail oriented, but it is very effective and efficient after it’s been completed;

  • Entry control. This included deliveries
  • Visitors and visitor control
  • Cameras, monitors, recording, and etc. This was used when necessary and sometimes with alarm panels and other electronic controls – all which had their own section
  • Emergency procedures. Broken down into the likely disasters that could befall the client and the different procedures for each.
  • Trucks, trailers, and pick-ups/drops of same
  • After hours maintenance
  • Equipment on post
  • Diagrams of the equipment, maps of the facility, usually broken down into separate maps for fire extinguishers, fire hoses, alarm pulls, lighting controls, and etc.

And these won’t be the only things in your Security Operations Manuals either. There may be thing sin your facilities that need their own sections. I’ve worked at heavy manufacturing plants before and special care had to be shown for the chemical tanks and other hazards.

                So, as with many posts I write, I’m giving you the generalized guidelines to make your security officers more effective and efficient. You will always have to write your own and tweak them to the needs of your company/clients. Despite what some people want you to believe, there is no ‘one size fits all’ in security – no matter how many places are alike.

 

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Do Your Own Thang

I’ve been told, and overheard, that workplace violence (WPV) seems to be getting worse. Barely a week goes by and there is another mass shooting somewhere in the country and on the news. But is that really the case? Or is that just our perception of events?

                Despite this being my specialty, I have to admit it’s not necessarily worse than it was in the 80’s & 90’s.

                There are 3 reasons for this seeming to be so much worse than it really is, and it’s not the proliferation of firearms;

  • The culture we live in – and not because of firearms proliferation
  • The media
  • ‘Perception is Reality’

 

Explanations:

                Let’s start with the culture in the United States. As I stated in my book (One is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace Violence), I believe that the seeds of WPV were sowed in the 60’s, 70’s, & 80’s. It all started with the ‘Do your own thang’ mentality of the drug culture of the 60’s.

                It then progressed to the ‘Me Generation’ of the 70’s. Add to that the recklessness of disco and ‘Let it all hang out’ pushed us even closer. Then came the 80’s.

                Greed is good and our self-esteem was sooo low, according to the conventional wisdom and ‘progressive thinkers’. You have to do things to make yourself feel better. It doesn’t matter whether or not someone else gets hurt, you have to let it out and seek ways to boost your self-esteem and make yourself feel better (remember scream therapy?). Unfortunately, far too many people decided that killing others or at the very least shooting up businesses was the way to accomplish this!

                Then we come to the media. We live in a period of 24 hour news channels. It all started with CNN & HLN. Then a proliferation of others MsNBC, FOX, Bloomberg, al Jazeera-America, amongst others. And let’s not forget the plethora of all news radio stations across the country.

                We are constantly bombarded with news. These networks have to fight to be the first to report on something and/or find stories the others aren’t covering. Therefore, they are going g to play up these events and attempt to position themselves as ‘the news leader’. And there we get the sensationalism of news items.

                30 years ago, we had the main networks with news at 6 and 10 and CNN. Not much competition in the industry. And now with newspapers losing out and going strictly digital and the overabundance of news channels…

                Lastly one phrase I’ve trumpeted for years. Perception is Reality. Our perception’s shape our reality. Many times what we perceive is what gets ingrained in our brains and is almost impossible to remove without something else to ‘perceive’ as the truth. Which is why many of the perpetrators of WPV believe that their actions are justifiable?

                So is WPV more prevalent now or what is causing the perception that it is? To be perfectly honest, it’s all three. It’s our culture, the media, & our own perceptions of what is going on around us. We walk on the Sunnyside of the street and don’t want to see the ‘dark side’ until it jumps up and bites us in the arse.

                There is no doubt that WPV is a serious issue within the business world. It affects everyone involved and costs billions of dollars to the American economy and those who push it forward. And the devastation it leaves on family members is even worse. Unfortunately, the perceptions of the masses will keep businesses from trying to prevent it in any meaningful way.

 

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

Designing a Training Program for your Security Officers – Part 3

In the last few posts, I talked about the who, why and how of starting a training program for your security officers. And this is whether or not your local municipality requires it or not.

                I will tell you, again emphatically, that you need to train your officers no matter if you are required or not! Being honest, I don’t care if your budget doesn’t allow for anything more than cursory training. You need to train them to be officers and not ‘guards’! If you don’t, then you are   opening yourself to having an immense of turnover, lost clients, & worse lawsuits. Training is one of the most vital things you can do for your client or company.

 

What to Teach:

                Here is a list of what needs to be included in your classes. And keep in mind that this is not necessarily all inclusive, but it’ll give you a good start on it;

  • Introduction – You need to explain, through your experience why security is important and the implications of what they are undertaking.
  • Codes of Conducts/Ethics: This is very important so that they know why people should look up to them while they are on duty, and how to conduct themselves on post.
  • General Orders – These are important because they outline what they can and can’t do before, during, and after work.
  • Policies & Procedures – This is different than general orders because this is where they get their authority from and enforcement protocol
  • * History of security – Yes, the history of. They have to know where and the how’s of both good and bad. And this would also include YOUR company

After this preamble to your company and the security field, the next part is even harder. Now you have to get into the specifics of the security function and various duties they might have to perform;

  • Physical Security – You may not think about it, but knowing the why’s and where’s of physical security and why they’re there is just as important as anything.
  • Report Writing: This is one of the most important aspects of training a security officer
  • Patrolling: If report writing is important, then this is probably even more so. If an officer doesn’t know how to properly patrol, then they will set themselves up for issues and missed problems.
  • Uniforms – In the states where there is regulatory control by the state, this is a mandatory item
  • Emergency Procedures – Your officers need to know the major types of disaster and how to combat them on post including hazardous materials and natural disasters
  • Customer Service – Yes, customer service. You may not think of this as security related but it most certainly does apply. You have to teach your officers to have a good customer service attitude and be professional. This shouldn’t take, more than an hour for a cursory overview, but it is necessary.

                Lastly, the things that any good class needs is testing. If you don’t test their knowledge after the class, how do you know if they’ve retained what they’ve been taught? I always closed my classes by asking questions. I changed the question and path of the question during this period as well. We talked about the ways some companies tested officers in the past, one last point on that way –DON’T DO IT! All you’re doing is short changing both the officers and the client/company.

                Is this an all-inclusive list of what to train in? Absolutely not. This is just what is taught in the classroom. After this they have to be taught what to do on their various new assignments and the way the client wants things done.

                And over above that is if they are taking on a special assignment i.e. HazMat, strikes, loss prevention, or something similar.

                Training is never, absolutely never, cheap and effective. I was told several years ago during a presentation this little adage is so appropriate: ‘You can have it quick. You can have it cheap. You can have it good. But you can’t have it quick and cheap, nor can you have it cheap and good. And not even quick and good. Take your pick of the three.’

                But if you choose wrong, can your company, insurance, and officers rebound from bad press, lawsuits, losses resulting from, and many other deleterious effects?

 

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace violence issues.

                His latest book ‘one is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace violence is available for numerous e-book formats. It helps all organizations to reduce their risk and limit their liability of an incident. And it does this by breaking the rules in several ways, as well as following conventional wisdom in others.

                He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or Visit his Facebook page (One is too Many), Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.