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Month: May, 2014

Apology & article

I want to apologize for not posting on here recently. Century Link hasn’t been the most reliable in recent weeks in keeping our internet lines up and running. It’s been a hit or miss at times. It’ll come on and then give us 5 minutes and then go off for hours.

Finally, after 4 visits, they’ve admitted that there is a short ‘somewhere’ in the lines. And it is somewhere between here and who knows where. So as soon as they can get it tracked down and repaired, I’ll be back up and posting twice weekly again. Until then…

On the other hand, here is an article I came across about hospital security. It says, among other items, that I’ve been right about hospital security and cutting security budgets despite the potential for violence. Enjoy and take care!

Using Risk-Based Security to Stem the Tide of Violence in Hospitals

Security InfoWatch (05/22/14) Ramsey-Hamilton, Caroline

Since 2010, violence in healthcare has skyrocketed, with hospitals and other provider locations experiencing a major increase in violence, instigated by patients, patient families and even healthcare staff. The Department of Homeland Security and a consortium of state and local hospitals recently released a standard for active shooters in healthcare. The changes in healthcare, including the increase in insured Medicaid patients and increased traffic to emergency departments, highlights the fact that people are working with an outdated security model that has not evolved to address a changing healthcare environment.

The change in billing and reimbursements for healthcare organizations, such as tracking of readmission rates, has squeezed hospital profits causing reductions in funding in many security departments at a time when violent events are steadily increasing. A new risk-based model for hospital security uses technology to a greater extent, employs forecasting and statistical models to predict the likelihood of future incidents, and is proactive instead of reactive, focusing money and energy on preventing events instead of simply responding to them. This model also uses risk assessment formulas to quickly assess the current security profile of a hospital, clinic, hospice, or behavioral health facility, factoring in heightened threat-risk environment, not only for the facility in question, but also adding in the wealth of healthcare data that’s now available. A major focus of this model is the continual assessment and evaluation of preventive security controls, which are reviewed quarterly, semi-annually, or annually to discover gaps in controls, and to fix gaps as soon as they are identified. Instead of waiting for manual recording of security incidents every day, software programs allow hospital security officers to enter data at the end of each shift, and that means security directors can map what’s happening in the hospital or facility on a daily, weekly, monthly and yearly

Leadership

A Leadership example from the past that is still relevant

            The following excerpt from the book “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill is still as relevant In todays convoluted world as it was when it was originally published  nearly 100 years ago. .

            And while these 11 items listed here may apply to entrepreneurship rather than security, they can still be applied to any organization or leadership format. Instead of thinking of growing rich how about thinking and leading a loyal crew?

            I have added a couple of tid bits of my own in parentheses at the end of Mr. Hill’s lines.

 

  1. Unwavering courage based upon knowledge of self, and of one’s occupation.  No follower wishes to be dominated by a leader who lacks self-confidence and courage.  No intelligent follower will be dominated by such a leader very long. (You have to know what you’re doing, even if you’re new to the field or department. And if you’re unfamiliar with it, then learn quickly and take suggestions)

 

2.                Self-control.  The man who cannot control himself can never control others.  Self-control sets a mighty example for one’s followers, which the more intelligent will emulate. (It’s not always easy to do, but it must be done. Not to say that you can lose your top once in a blue moon. They may wonder about following someone who never shows any emotion)

 

  1. A keen sense of justice.  Without a sense of fairness and justice, no leader can command and retain the respect of his followers. (Don’t use a trivial reason or someone else’s reasoning to be rid of a problem – defend them even if you don’t like them!)

 

  1. Definiteness of decision.  The man who wavers in his decisions shows that he is not sure of himself and cannot lead others successfully. (This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t ask for suggestions, just don’t be wishy washy!)

 

  1. Definiteness of plans. The successful leader must plan his work, and work his plan.  A leader who moves by guesswork, without practical, definite plans, is comparable to a ship without a rudder.  Sooner or later he will land on the rocks.

 

6. The habit of doing more than paid for.  One of the penalties of leadership is the necessity of willingness, upon the part of the leader, to do more than he requires of his followers. (In other words don’t ask others to do what you don’t want to do unless it is an absolute necessity)

 

7. A pleasing personality.  No slovenly, careless person can become a successful leader.  Leadership calls for respect.  Followers will not respect a leader who does not grade high on all of the factors of a pleasing personality. (Doesn’t mean you can’t be driven or a hard a**, but you still have to be human and lead with compassion – no matter the situation)

 

  1. Sympathy and understanding.  The successful leader must be in sympathy with his followers.  Moreover, he must understand them and their problems.

 

  1. Mastery of detail.  Successful leadership calls for mastery of the details of the leader’s position. (Do you know all that is required of you either from the corporate or human level?)

 

  1. Willingness to assume full responsibility.  The successful leader must be willing to assume responsibility for the mistakes and the shortcomings of his followers. If he tries to shift this responsibility, he will not remain the leader.  If one of his followers makes a mistake, and shows him incompetent, the leader must consider that it is they who failed. (in other words ‘The Buck Stops at YOUR desk’)

 

11. Cooperation.  The successful leader must understand and apply the principle of cooperative effort and be able to induce his followers to do the same.  Leadership calls for power, and power calls for cooperation. (just remember that power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely)

 

            Be on the lookout for my new book. I will be posting some blogs with excerpts from the book and other relevant posts to promote the book. You can purchase the book within a few weeks at your favorite on-line bookstore. ‘One is too Many: Recognizing & Preventing Workplace Violence’.

 

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 23 studying workplace/school violence.

            He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him through his Facebook page at One is too Many. Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

The Rules Part II

The Rules

 

7. Education begins with exposure. My take on security education is simple – you don’t know what you need to know because you’re not out there asking the right people or questions, or you don’t wanna. I know some people may be scratching their heads at that. But it’s the truth. So many of us are ignorant of the threat or the tools we can use because we haven’t taken the steps to “get smart” about them.

 

8. Befriend your enemy. I’m not saying that you need to take milk and cookies into the state prison or send friend requests on Facebook to members of a terrorist group. But learning their techniques and practices can and will make your facility more secure in the long run.

 

9. Everyone has a sales pitch. Be careful of it no matter where you go or work. Your dignity and respect with clients is in the balance if you try to sell something that cuts against their bottom line interests. Even if they need it and it’s a good idea, you have to voice it in a different way than a sales pitch. A good example is a hospital. They may need a dozen armed officers because of the neighborhood, but will that invoke a sense of well-being or hospitality amongst the sick and injured that they serve?

 

10. Vigilance is demanded. Will you demand that from your officers or department? Or will you simply accept the fact that they’re all human and will make mistakes? An old adage that I’ve used for 25 years or so and pushed on all of my officers, much to their chagrin and the companies I worked for, is this simple line “The best isn’t and good enough never is”.

                I never accept the fact that nothing can be done better than it is. There is always a way to get better or that some ner’do well can upset the best laid security plan and perimeter. Remember some mice are adept at avoiding the trap and still getting the cheese!

 

                We need to remember these rules and try to live by them. Whether we’re in security, health care, retail, service, or transportation, it doesn’t matter. These rules need to be remembered and put into action by everyone, whether they specifically apply to you or not.

                Adapt them, without changing the meaning, and keep learning from them. You’ll never know everything about your field, in today’s ever changing digital modern world that’s impossible. But you can keep learning and adapting. And in security it’s not just a suggestion it’s a standard and a mission in order to keep the client or company safe. And remember that following conventional wisdom(CW) isn’t always the bestpractice.

 

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 22 studying workplace/school violence issues.

            He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him through his Facebook page at One is too Many. Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

The Rules – For Everyone in Security

The Rules – For Everyone in Security

                There are rules and regulations for practically everything we do and fail to do, in every single career field, skilled or not. Security is no different. But in some ways the higher up in an organization we get or the longer we’re in the field, we have a tendency to forget some items which are fundamental.

                At least they should be. To both newly hired rookies and those of us that have been in the field for decades. We have a tendency to forget them and the newbies don’t get taught. So to point them out here;

 

  1. Our business is about risk. We deal with asking and solving really tough questions the client/company is often scared to ask about or doesn’t know exist.

 

  1. Security is a mindset, not an objective. How many security, c-suite executives, and others believe that you can actually quantify the security function – specifically for the bottom line?

 

3. Know your tools. Learn, learn, and then learn some more! It doesn’t hurt to explore about the innumerable options available. You wouldn’t buy a car based on hearsay, why buy security products that away?

 

  1. Know your limitations. While we are pushed, derided, and taunted, to know anything and everything about security, you can’t. Call someone else in to help out. Admit you don’t know it all – the client will, hopefully, be impressed by this kind of admission.
  2. Define your goals. What do you want to protect and why? What is the goal in protecting them? Is it an insurance break, protecting lives, resources/financial, or something else? What’s the harm in knowing the limitations of yourself, Staff, or department?

 

6. Know your terrain. Do you really understand the security environment? I’m not just talking about the threat. So often, we ignore the internal and external impacts of our measures which undermine our ability to properly protect these assets. Many times they seem perfectly harmless, until it becomes an inconvenience and an over-whelming pain in the a** (remember 9/11 and extra security for 6 months?)

 

                The rest of this and the remaining 4 or so will be coming your way soon. And these items can work for any business. It takes a bit of self-analysis to know and learn from the rules and then remember them. Even if you are the type to always wanna break the rules. Some of them can’t be broken and you still be successful!

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 22 studying workplace/school violence issues.

            He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him through his Facebook page at One is too Many. Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.

More articles on WPV

More articles on WPV

                Here are a couple of articles that I’ve gleaned lately concerning workplace violence.

 

Security Officers to Receive Firearms at Mo. Hospital St. Joseph News-Press (MO) (04/29/14) Hoppa, Kristin Derek Conz, the security team leader at Heartland Regional Medical Center in Missouri, says that 13 security guards will be authorized to carry and use a .9-millimeter pistol during patrol duty on the hospital’s campus beginning May 1. According to Conz, the security officers went through the same training as police cadets as well as additional training that exceeds current training standards. Heartland’s board of trustees provided the funds to purchase the firearms, after deciding in August 2013 to add armed guards to the campus. The board required all officers to undergo new background checks, firearm qualifications, and a psychological exam before assigning them as armed guards. Each guard must also qualify for re-certification twice a year. Conz said that having armed security guards on Heartland’s campus will help ensure that all staff, patients, and visitors are safe, particularly after the security team had to deal with an incident earlier in the year where a man with a handgun entered the main lobby of the hospital. The security team that responded was armed only with Tasers.

 

Nurse Stabbings Spur Calls for Workplace Violence Prevention

“It’s a job we all love and you just want to come to work and do it and be safe,” said Margie Keenan, a nurse of 40 years

By Vikki Vargas and Willian Avila |  Monday, Apr 21, 2014  |  Updated 9:38 PM PDT

Vikki Vargas/Lori Bentley

The stabbings of two nurses in different hospitals on the same day is putting the spotlight on efforts to make hospitals more accountable for incidents of violence. Vikki Vargas reports from Long Beach for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Monday, April 21, 2014.

Less than a week after two on-duty nurses were stabbed in separate attacks at Southern California hospitals, a state senate labor committee will hear for the first time from healthcare workers about workplace violence prevention plans.

A proposed senate bill would require hospitals to report violent workplace incidents to Cal/OSHA and to make those statistics available online. It would also force hospitals to have prevention programs and annual training in place.

However, the California Hospital Association said the proposed bill only duplicates existing law, calling it “vague, costly” and “not grounded in hospital safety/security principles.”

The bill, SB-1299, was introduced by state Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Los Angeles), who is running for secretary of state and lists on his website the California Nurses Association among his endorsers.

Hospital workers and state lawmakers are set to meet Thursday, after a pair of attacks on nurses at UCLA medical facilities on the same day.

The first attack took place at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar just after 2 a.m. Sunday. A nurse was stabbed in the torso by a 26-year-old man who ran past a weapons screening area, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. He was arrested and the nurse was in critically hurt.

The second attack happened a few hours later at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance when a man grabbed a nurse from behind and stabbed her in the ear with what was believed to be a pencil. The 38-year-old attacker was arrested and the nurse was treated for non-life-threatening injuries, sheriff’s officials said.

At California State University, Long Beach, one of the required courses for all nursing students is a class in non-violent crisis intervention.

Some students said they never thought it would be part of their mandatory curriculum, but they have learned now to negotiate with angry patients and deflect a physical fight.

“It’s a job we all love and you just want to come to work and do it and be safe,” said Margie Keenan, a nurse of 40 years.

 

http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/After-Nurse-Stabbings-Hospital-Workers-Seek-Change-Through-Bill-256119941.html

 

Business Security a Balance of Risk, Cost Atlanta Journal-Constitution (04/30/14) P. 8A Kanell, Michael E.; Yamanouchi, Kelly With workplaces being the most common place where mass shootings occur, according to a 2013 report from the Congressional Research Service, businesses want to implement strong security to prevent such incidents from taking place. However, they must balance the risks of a mass shooting with the cost of providing a level of security capable of protecting against these types of attacks. According to Darrell Mercer, the owner of Mercer Protection Agency, this level of security could include armed guards, cameras, electronic badges for employees, locked doors, and metal detectors. One way to keep costs down and avoid implementing excessive security measures is to be on the lookout for indicators that potentially violent employees often display before an incident of workplace violence occurs, said OR3M Chief Security Officer Jeffrey Slotnick. These behaviors can include aggression, depression, threatening behavior, and making references to weaponry. Slotnick says that when these indicators are present in clusters, they should be reported to the organization’s crisis management team which can offer assistance or counseling to prevent an incident from occurring.

 

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention and other security issues. With numerous interviews, blogs, articles, and 2 books he has proven himself in the security arena for more than 31 years, and 22 studying workplace/school violence issues.

            He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Contact him through his Facebook page at One is too Many. Here you will see and read about other items related to WPV/SV as well as incidents you may not have heard or thought about.