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Month: October, 2013

Pertinent WPV articles

October 29, 2013

Pertinent WPV articles

 

Millions of Employees Victims of Workplace Violence

Pantagraph (10/24/13) Sobota, Lenore

                The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has begun paying closer attention to violence between workers and to violence directed at employees by customers, clients or other outsiders, said Thomas Fuller, an assistant professor at Illinois State University who teaches a course on workplace violence. According to OSHA, nearly 2 million workers report being victims of workplace violence in an average year. Marvis Meyers, the vice president of training for AAIM Employers Association, has said that while she has seen a lot of training related to workplace violence for security and human resources personnel, she has not seen as much for the general employee population, a phenomenon she attributes to organizations believing that they will not be affected by workplace violence. She also noted that “violence is not necessarily just someone with a gun,” a sentiment shared by Fuller who has commented that more attention needs to be paid to harassment and bullying, which are forms of workplace violence. Fuller also noted that the most important steps a company must take toward reducing workplace violence are spelling out what type of conduct is not permitted and making it clear who misconduct should be reported to and how it should be handled.

http://www.pantagraph.com/business/local/1777775e-3c02-11e3-8fb5-0019bb2963f4.html

 

                I’ve said this for years following the report in 2005 from the University of South Florida. I still fully believe that WPV affects more than 50% of employees and 100% of employers. As the article says, many incidents go unreported.

 

Obama care to Impact Physical Security at Hospitals

Security InfoWatch (10/24/13) Griffin, Joel

                Experts say that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could have a major impact on physical security at healthcare facilities after it takes full effect. According to Ben Scaglione, the director of healthcare security services for G4S, provisions in the law relating to Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement mean that hospitals will have to make spending decisions on support services, including security. Many hospitals are cutting security to free up extra funds, and instead are outsourcing those positions to cheaper contract guard services providers. Scaglione noted that with the expected increase in people having health insurance, there will be more patient records to protect, so hospitals and other healthcare facilities will need to put an increased emphasis on access control and making sure that proper protocols are followed. Healthcare organizations also need to be aware of the dangers posed by petty criminals and organized crime rings who will be looking to steal patient information. The increase in the number of people having health insurance will also likely result in more people visiting emergency rooms, which will add stress to the highest-risk area of hospitals.

 

                With my wife working as an RN in a hospital this is particularly worrisome to me and her. Basically, if a gang member or other ner’do well is bed ridden (for whatever reason), then it may be impossible to stop a rival gang from storming in and doing something. The same holds true in the ER as well. Not to make a political statement, but hospitals don’t think that security is that important and it’s worth the risk.

 

            Clients rely on the 30 years of skills, knowledge, & expertise of Sollars Security Shield to ensure the safety and security of their property and their most important asset’s – their people. He helps these companies to avoid the multi-million dollar lawsuits that can result from a single incident of WPV.

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in numerous media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            Robert utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his experience and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training

www.Facebook.com/One is too Many

WPV & Communication

October 25, 2013

WPV & Communication

 

                “We don’t talk anymore!” How many times has that line been used in a sit com or drama television series or movie? It is a standard formula for relationships in those genres, not to mention innumerable novels and short stories. In some cases it’s the cause for a divorce.

                But in our modern technologically fast paced world, we don’t communicate anymore as we should. Face-to-face or on the phone is the best way to communicate with each other. And yet we don’t take the time to do so.

                Understandably, we are all busy and sometimes a text or e-mail is easier or preferable to taking the time to actually talking to someone who may be so long winded as to keep you on the phone for an innumerable amount of time so that you can’t do anything else, especially if you’re late for a meeting or dinner or something similar. Hmmm, seems like I just made my point.

                But in the realm of WPV it gets much more serious and can be deadly if we don’t communicate effectively face to face. Many managers, HR and floor, communicate quite well in this fashion, and it is one reason why the best practice in termination someone is face-to-face and not over the phone or otherwise.

                A prime example of not effectively communicating was back in 1998. At a General Dynamics facility a man was sent a lay-off notice via inter-office mail. Not so unusual at all, then. However, what was not very efficient or effective communication was the fact that the man had just buried his 6-year-old son, because of cancer, and had been on bereavement leave. No consolation, no sympathy, no personal meeting to break the news gently. ‘Okay, so sorry, but you’re fired. Bye Don’t let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya!’ If anyone had a reason for going off he did because of very poor communication skills by GD’s HR department.

 

                Some of this issue with poor communication skills is that we just don’t have the support networks that we need to have, like us old coots do, if something goes wrong in our lives. A recent study showed that the younger generations would rather text or send an e-mail rather than talk face-to-face. And that includes using other social media.

We isolate ourselves with text messages, e-mail, and social media. All to avoid talking to someone. Whether you agree or not, this isolation in comparison to face-to-face conversations and actually talking to someone on the phone takes a toll on us.

                E-mail, texting, and social media, don’t allow for us to reveal feelings in the real world. You can text someone, but how do you convey sadness, trouble, or a deeply troubling issue in a text or e-mail? As far as that goes what about Twitter or instagram?

                And because we utilize social media, the internet, and texting we don’t develop the social networks i.e. friendships, that we need if something happens. We don’t have shoulders to cry on or even complain to (as much). So instead of letting our feelings out in a safe manner (because many times we’re scared of the stigma of mental illness and health professionals) that we hold it inside until we explode – like the man did with a cigar in Lakewood California on the 7th of September, or the teenager did in Sparks Nevada on the 21st of October.

http://ktla.com/2013/09/27/man-sought-for-punching-store-clerk-in-dispute-over-cigar/#axzz2gVHEYFTJ

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/21/justice/nevada-middle-school-shooting/

 

 

                We need to begin communicating face-to-face again, whenever possible. It’s not necessarily a bad thing to talk on the phone or face-to-face to someone. It helps us to gauge their emotions and it allows us to let our emotions out. By doing this, we are releasing stress in our lives. If we don’t develop friendships then we are a lot like Robinson Crusoe. Set adrift on a desert island with no support.

                And if we set ourselves adrift in a sea of emotion with no land in sight then we are in for an explosion of emotion when the right trigger comes upon us. And many times, circumstances begin piling up on us and because we don’t know how to communicate to others and let our real emotions out we end up like the sailors on the USS Indianapolis at the tail end of WWII, either being eaten alive or sinking in that sea of emotion!

                And this in turn results in WPV and SV incidents. And in reality, in causes a great many violent incidents, including DV. And many times, even if we do communicate, it’s not with the right people i.e. Gang members or other hooligans.

                So, we need to relieve ourselves of our technology once in a while and talk face-to-face with people. Whether that be our kids, peers, friends, or just the public in general. Learn to utilize that thing below your nose that God so graciously gave us (although I’m sure that you would wish some people wouldn’t!).

 

            Clients rely on the 30 years of skills, knowledge, & expertise of Sollars Security Shield to ensure the safety and security of their property and their most important asset’s – their people. He helps these companies to avoid the multi-million dollar lawsuits that can result from a single incident of WPV.

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in numerous media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            Robert utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his experience and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training

www.Facebook.com/One is too Many

Social Media at work

October 22, 2013

Social Media at work

 

                There is no simple answer to social media in your business or preventing it from scuttling it! If you have employees, then you’ll have them posting pictures and messages on Facebook, twitter, instagram, and other outlets as soon as you have an incident at your facility. That is nearly impossible to stop.

                But what about on business owned equipment? From computers, cell phones, tablets, and other such items. If the business owns the instrument, then the business can make, and enforce, rules for using them. And obviously that means the utilization of social media.

                It has been noted that 46% of all breaches of security within a company’s computers and intellectual property came from employees. And a recent court case found a new employee who e-mailed himself thousands of documents and personal information from his work e-mail to a personal one. So it’s not just about posting erroneous items on Facebook.

 

Policies:

                The first thing you need to consider is a policy to prohibit such activities at work or on company owned equipment. In this instance you should also get the employee to sign an agreement to that effect. In the event that you are forced to discipline them for violating this policy you have an insurance policy to back you up.

                You may also consider the idea of ‘blocking’ access to those websites from the company devices. There are programs out there in the world that will allow you block any social media site. From Facebook to linkedin to Twitter. This may be a good option to consider. You won’t be able to block personal devices at work, but you can block company owned equipment.

                On one hand, however, you can install devices which will block all incoming/outgoing cellular/Wi-Fi signals within the walls of the facility.

 

Is it work related?

                Another key question to consider is it necessary for employees to access such social media in the performance of their jobs? In my case, and the case of many businesses, their social media presence is dictated by being available to access them at the office or on company owned devices. From Facebook, twitter, and even linkedin. They are all necessary to keep discussions and visibility in the public eye – which is vital in so many fields of endeavor.

 

Can you monitor their usage?

                If they are using company equipment, for the most part, you can monitor and regulate what they post, if it is on company time. Again, there are programs out there that will allow you to search for anything posted by employees or about the company with a search. What you do with that information is up to your individual state as to how you can or can’t discipline them. For this you may want to check with your legal department or legal advisor/consultant. But don’t allow them to change the policies into legalese or something that only an attorney can understand.    

 

Conclusion:

                Always check with a corporate attorney for your policy on social media and if it is legal in your state or locality. Ensure that it is not written in legalese and easily understood.

                Another point to consider with this is if it is a blanket policy. Blanket policies can be challenged as discriminatory in so many ways, which is why the legal department needs to be called in AND, again, not written in legalese. And lastly, ensure that your employees read, understand, and sign for that fact.

                They should also know the consequences of using company devices and using them improperly. The younger generations, millennials, don’t necessarily understand why those of us that are older are ‘so uptight’ about those rules.

                Social media can be a wonderful tool for businesses. But if an event happens that is negative, then you’ll have your company, name, and pictures plastered everywhere if you’re not careful. And if you ban the usage of social media for all employees, then you may also encourage a backlash so tread carefully.

                And if you do indeed have an incident of WPV/SV, then you need to get to Facebook, Twitter, instagram, and other innumerable sites to inform people of the truth and not rumor. Remember, employees, students, and others will undoubtedly be on those sites making their own ‘assumptions’ about what happened. And eventually rumors, innuendo, and falsehoods become the truth. And there many instances of urban myths that prove that.

 

            Clients rely on the 30 years of skills, knowledge, & expertise of Sollars Security Shield to ensure the safety and security of their property and their most important asset’s – their people. He helps these companies to avoid the multi-million dollar lawsuits that can result from a single incident of WPV.

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in numerous media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            Robert uses the 30 years of field experience to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his experience and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training

www.Facebook.com/One is too Many

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October 18, 2013

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

 

I’m sorry that I am late with this blog. However, October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Whether you believe it or not it is a serious issue for everyone involved with either the management of a company or its security. But why should it become a problem with management or security when it’s such a personal issue and relegated to a ‘domestic’ problem not work

                The issue becomes important and pertinent to us all because domestic violence can come into our businesses and create chaos, havoc, & destruction on everyone inside. Whether they are there when an incident occurs or not.

                It can wreck lives, ruin lives, and basically create chaos within the walls of the business. And if the company does nothing to combat it before it starts and enters the business, then they can be held liable for the death and destruction that can visit the company.

 

Statistics:

                A few statistics that may bring home DV to anyone who may not have been visited by its insidious presence before and realized its impact on the workplace;

40% of all murders in the workplace involving women are related to domestic violence

3 – 4 women are murdered by their significant others every single day of the year

Murder is the #1 cause of death for women at work

5% of all WPV is committed by someone with a connection to the worker

Between 3 – 5 billion annually in lost productivity, absenteeism, and health care

 

                In December 2012, Kansas City Chiefs Jevon Belcher committed suicide at the team’s practice facility. Why? Because he had murdered his girlfriend at their home.  He did this in front of a couple of his coaches. This shows that DV impacts the workplace more often and our lives than we may think, even if it doesn’t start at work.

                As for statistics, think about the one above of 3-4 women are killed every day by their significant other. This is the same number that was killed in the workplace every day in the 90’s. We were all in such an up-roar then over that. Where is the outrage over DV because of these numbers?

 

Prevention:

So the statistics may be unsettling for some. But after they have been digested and you have accepted them the next question is how to protect your employees. For both victims and co-workers alike. It’s more than just protecting the business and its financial resources. Here are a few areas that you need to think about for DV prevention occurring in your business.

Listening and believing that the employee may be abused

Looking for the signs of abuse

Security procedures for an abused employee

Assistance programs for an abused employee

Legal, security, & spiritual help for the employee (don’t let legal tell you that you can’t)

Ease of transferring of employees to different shifts or locations

Extra security measures in parking lots, entrances, & such

Recording (or ability) of phone calls on the employees phone

Privacy of the employee if they are abused (should be limited to a ‘need to know’ basis)

 

Conclusion:

                DV is not just a personal issue, especially when it comes into the workplace and threatens co-workers, customers, employees, and the wellbeing of everyone there. It is an issue that literally can make some employees fear for their lives, whether they are the victim or not.

                Many television shows have shown DV in a humorous situation. And while it can be put into a humorous light, it is seldom funny to the victim. The Honeymooners, All in the Family, & more recently Family Guy (Halloween episode in 2011 entitled Screams in Silence). There was never any doubt that Ralph Kramden and Archie Bunker loved their wives, but the yelling, berating, & threats were DV.

                As security and HR professionals we need to recognize the potential of DV to invade our work spaces and cause injury. And the injury will typically not just be relegated to the abused employee. Many times it will spill over to co-workers – and if it’s a customer…

 

RESOURCES & RELATED ARTICLE BRIEFS:

How Awareness and Communication Improve Workforce Protection

Security Magazine (10/13)

                Violence in the workplace is a greater issue in the United States than elsewhere in the world, says Paul N. Whelan, a senior manager at global staffing provider Kelly Services who is focused on preventing workplace violence. The definition of “workplace violence” involves confrontations and verbal arguments. “The key is to understand what can lead to violence and mitigating the risk from there,” Whelan says. “Is an employee not being paid correctly? Is there inappropriate banter about emotionally charged issues (religion or politics)?” Domestic abuse also may impact a workforce, says Barry Nixon, founder of the National Institute for the Prevention of Workplace Violence. Managers should be aware that arguments conducted over the phone, over email, or in person could impact the whole staff, and should establish plans and suggestions for troubled employees. Nixon suggests that companies implement a post-hire questionnaire, including a domestic violence section, to help them gain up-front information about an employee’s situation for future use among enterprise security executives. A company’s level of involvement can change public opinion and save lives. For example, many U.S. taxi companies were plagued by workplace violence, but major changes in operations, including the addition of security cameras, GPS, instant communication, and credit-card offerings instead of operating On an all-cash basis, have helped decrease the homicide rate of taxi drivers. Whelan recommends that firms use a top-down approach to building a workforce protection policy, and that enterprises of all sizes partner with local law enforcement and trained personnel or security officers. Firms also should gain certifications and training through security organizations and read security-industry publications for points of reference for solutions and information.

 

 

The National Center for Victims of Crime:

http://www.victimsofcrime.org

 

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence:

http://www.ncadv.org

 

        The National Domestic Violence Hotline

http://www.thehotline.org 

 

New California Law Requires Employers to Make Security Accommodations for Domestic Violence Victims

Security InfoWatch (10/16/13) Herdt, Timm

                California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill on Oct. 11 that will require employers to make security accommodations for employees who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Under the new law, employers will be prohibited from discriminating against employees based on their status as a victim of any of these crimes, and will be forbidden from taking adverse actions against or

terminating an employee because of that status. Employers will also be required to accommodate some employee requests for increased security, such as changing a telephone extension to guard against potential harassing phone calls. However, the law does not require employers to accommodate any requests that would create an undue hardship on the operation of the business. Workers seeking the protection of the law will be required to notify their employers of their status by providing documentation, such as a court order, police report, or a letter from a medical provider or victim’s advocate. The law is scheduled to go into effect on Jan. 1.

 

                Special thanks to Danielle Collinwood of the Mesa (AZ) Family Advocacy Center who helped with the links and organizations included above.

       

                Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in more than 125 media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            He utilizes his years of field knowledge to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his own experiences and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training

www.Facebook.com/One is too Many

Social Media & Violence

October 16, 2013

Social Media & Violence

 

                Facebook, twitter, instgram, and innumerable private and public social media sites abound in our world. The question that has popped up in the past few years is if it is a place to exercise your 1st Amendment rights to free speech or not?

                They are certainly a place to have people go for an open forum, much like the chat rooms on AOL, Yahoo, or other providers that were so popular earlier in the century. And they have just as many detractors as proponents. But the question remains are they safe, sane, and a true forum?

                In most respects they are. They allow people from across the country to keep up with friends and family, that they may not be able to otherwise. I keep up with my cousin and good friends that way from across the world. And of course I have 2 Facebook pages for both the business and my forthcoming book (www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training and www.Facebook.com/One is too Many). They allow me to instruct and inform people of the numerous WPV/SV incidents I come across.

                And there have been innumerable incidents, of all kinds, where Facebook and twitter have been the first reporting from the scene i.e. the wildfires in Yarnell AZ. Back in June. This as well as storms, earthquakes, hurricanes, building collapses, and even WPV/SV. And therein lays the rub with social media.

                Social media has become a place where people believe they can post anything and never have any consequences to it. That is not so, whether you think it’s private or not. If you post a threat or something similar, it will be read. And depending on how serious it is, it will get reported to the right people (hopefully).

                Here is a link to a story that I came across from Abilene, Texas recently and social media. It kind of tells a good story and the severe consequences that a teenager can face, and basically ruin their chances for a good career later in life.

http://www.bigcountryhomepage.com/story/cooper-hs-student-arrested-for-violence-threat-no-charges-for-ahs-prankster/d/story/EVz7Ib1-okmdfUSAs415XQ

                There have also been innumerable incidents where Facebook threats and harassment have led to felony charges against other people. Both students and adults. None of us is immune to being prosecuted for threats and harassment to either another student or a co-worker. They can even lead to us being fired or suspended/dismissed from school

                And in some cases a good investigator, can dig up stuff that you thought was private and cost you, literally millions of dollars. Don’t think that’s true? Let me enlighten you to a story I got from FOX in the spring of 2008.

                A high school student was a star standout football player. He was being offered a full ride scholarship to be a Cal Golden Bear. All that had to happen is pass a ‘moral’ background check from the University – no big deal.

                The University of California – Berkeley wanted to ensure that their scholarship students were of higher moral character than the normal population. No arrests for felonies, no drug use, gang affiliation, and etc. A reasonable and laudable goal.

                This 18-year-old stated that he didn’t use drugs and had no idea of how to get them. He tested clean in a drug test. The check was about done and he was flying with all the goody two shoes record as you can imagine, until…

                A shrewd investigator gathered some OSI (Open Source Intelligence) on the young man’s friends Facebook page. There was a picture up there that showed this prospect and a friend, tokin on a joint and wearing t-shirts with a marijuana leaf on it. This prospect was sunk and eventually signed with a Division II school, which could cost him millions of dollars if he makes it to the NFL.

                Next time we’ll talk about what your social media policies should be at work. And watch for a post soon on BYOD.

 

            Clients rely on the 30 years of skills, knowledge, & expertise of Sollars Security Shield to ensure the safety and security of their property and their most important asset’s – their people. He helps these companies to avoid the multi-million dollar lawsuits that can result from a single incident of WPV.

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in numerous media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            Robert uses the 30 years of field experience to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his experience and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training

www.Facebook.com/One is too Many

Be a Bionic Observer

October 4, 2013

Be a Bionic Observer

 

                I’m not encouraging you to become Steve Austin. I’m not suggesting that you have surgery to remove body parts in return for ‘super enhanced’ parts. We’re not asking for running down stolen cars, jumping into buildings on fire, but simply to observe, and record.  

                We live in a souped up technological world with cameras in our phones, onboard computers in our cars, so instead of tweaking and sending embarrassing videos of sleeping people, use them to watch out for ner’do wells, record other out of the norm items, observe a threat of potential danger and report it.               

                However, when it comes to technology today, we can be a ‘bionic observer’ anywhere needed. From home, school, shopping mall, highway, or even on vacation. We can literally do so many things and possibly stop/solve a crime, help catch a suspect, or prevent something from occurring.                What do I mean by this? It’s really quite simple if you look closely. And we can all be this way if we spot anything suspicious – anywhere.               

                Remember the cliché that I constantly spout. Anytime, anywhere, for any reason, to anyone!’ This is so true, again. But just as realistically, we can actually prevent or solve a crime with what’s at our finger tips and being a bionic observer. 

 

Take a Picture:               

 

Remember the adage, ‘Take a Picture, it’ll last longer’? It does, and can be very valuable to any number of law enforcement agencies in the pursuit of a criminal.               

                At the school bus stop you notice a car that has been there for several days with someone inside and running. You should be aware of it and then ask the question ‘Why are they there and who are they’.               

                If you take a picture of their car, possibly the person, and just keep it around then you could possibly stop an abduction of a child and worse. The same holds true for the shopping mall with someone who doesn’t ‘look quite right or in the wrong place’.               

                Many times, these people will get spooked and leave and not bother you or anyone at that location again. It doesn’t mean they won’t start trolling for another opportunity to abduct a child, shoot someone, or rob a store. But if you record it and keep it, then it’s possible you could help solve that crime. 

 

Be Aware:               

                I already said you need to be aware of what’s around you. I’ve said this to hundreds of people and thousands of times. But it is true, if you are aware of your surroundings, then the likelihood of something happening to you or a loved one is less likely.               

                The adage of ‘See something Say Something’ is just as true as my adage above. Don’t hesitate to tell a ‘mall cop’. They are better trained than any of the movies have portrayed them – they’re usually comedies and it’s no fun if they’re serious and knows what the hell they’re doing!               

                No one knows for a fact that the incident in Nairobi, Kenya could have been prevented on September 22nd. In this world of escalating violence closing in on us, we can not retreat, but we need to start looking out for one another, being our own security, watching out for ours, and those around us. we need to be bionic observers and not for the pleasure of mooning a crowd but to keep those we love safe. But if it could have been, then the people who could have prevented it, generally native Kenyans shopping, no one said anything until it was too late.               

 

Conclusion:                

                Those are just 2 ways that your new-fangled mobile phones can be of use to preventing crime. Take pictures. Put them on a tablet or computer for safeguarding until later. Hopefully you’ll never have to use them. And hopefully nothing bad will ever happen to you or your family or loved ones. But why take the chance?                 

                How many different new technologically advanced devices do you own? Is there any way to use that technology for a better purpose than just keeping notes or flapping our gums? Think about it and possibly you can be the next Steve Austin or Jamie Summers and Use that technology and become a bionic observer!   

 

            Clients rely on the 30 years of skills, knowledge, & expertise of Sollars Security Shield to ensure the safety and security of their property and their most important asset’s – their people. He helps these companies to avoid the multi-million dollar lawsuits that can result from a single incident of WPV.

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in numerous media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            Robert uses the 30 years of field experience to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his experience and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

www.Facebook.com/Today’s Training

www.Facebook.com/One is too Many

What If…

October 1, 2013

What If…

 

            I’ve talked innumerable times about how to prevent an incident of WPV and SV in our world. But, what if, despite all of our efforts something does happen and a person (s) walks into the workplace/school and starts firing a pistol or assault rifle?

            What should we be teaching our family members/loved ones and just as importantly teaching them what not to do. Unfortunately, far too often all we do is we wring our collective hands and cry woe is me. We wail and cry that we never seen it coming and what are we to do (remember 2 weeks ago in Washington D.C.). Then we form another taskforce and spend millions of dollars to ‘study the problem’. Or worse we have a knee jerk reaction to firearms collectively!

            We do this, but what should we be doing to prevent more tragedies? We need to be teaching both our family members (even the adults) and children to protect themselves in the incidence of a WPV/SV occurs. In a crisis situation, there are a couple of things that we can do and teach them to keep and have around to try and keep them safe.

Evacuation Plans

            The first thing is ensure that your wife, husband, other family member, children (no matter their age) knows the evacuation plan for their employment/school. Teach, teach, and teach again! Teach them until they’re sick of hearing it. Knowing where to get out of the school can help save their lives even with firearms being involved.

 

And if they can’t evacuate

            The other scenario is what if they can’t get out, due to the shooter being on their floor or wing. In this instance they need to learn how to barricade the door to keep the shooter from coming in. As in most WPV/SV events, the shooter will pick the path of least resistance to accomplish their goals. They know that they have a limited amount of time and want to cause as much mayhem as possible. So making it harder to get into a classroom will cause them to move to the next target, and not spend too much time on one door/room.

 

Escape plan possibility

            If you can remember to the time when you got a newspaper, in the Sunday magazine, you’d see the ads for the rope or chain ladders to help escape the house during a fire? Why can’t we not utilize this same idea to help evacuate a business/school where a disaster may occur? This type of device, where appropriate, could help save more than a couple of lives in the instance of a fire and not just an active shooter.

Run, hide, and fight

            Like with the evacuation plan, teach them how to utilize the idea of run hide and fight.

Run – If you can run like the wind and get away, then do it.

Hide – If you can’t get out, then find a hidey hole and stay put.

Fight – If you try to escape and/or you’re found, fight like a shark with a seal.

 

Alert system

            Lastly, an alert system code use on the PA system. When the office hears of a shooter, there may be enough time to alert the students/employees over the PA system. Something as simple as ‘Red West 2’ could mean an incident such as a fire at the west end of the second floor.  “Black East 3 could mean a bomb threat or harmful person in the corridor of the east side of third floor.

http://www.violence-free.com/blog/bid/96635/how-to-effectively-use-a-workplace-duress-code?source=Blog_Email_%5BHow%20to%20Effectively%20U%5D

 

Conclusion

            These are just a few simple ways to ensure that your loved ones, friends, co-workers, and etc. can survive an incident if one were to occur at the school or business. It is fortunate that these incidents, active shooters, are few and far in between. Remember, you are more likely to be hit by lightning than with a bullet, either at school or work. But the other thing that you have to pay attention to and be aware of, constantly is the fact that  

Any time, anywhere, to anyone, for any reason!

 

            Clients rely on the 30 years of skills, knowledge, & expertise of Sollars Security Shield to ensure the safety and security of their property and their most important asset’s – their people. He helps these companies to avoid the multi-million dollar lawsuits that can result from a single incident of WPV.

            Robert D. Sollars is a recognized expert on workplace/school violence prevention. He has appeared in numerous media outlets in the past 30 years of being in the field and 20 studying, writing, and speaking about WPV/SV.

            Robert uses the 30 years of field experience to give real life examples of incidents pulled from both his experience and the news headlines. Let him do this for you as well. Contact him at 480-251-5197 or visit the website at;

www.sollarssecurityshield.com

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